150th Anniversary
Tryon County:  Part II

Johnstown, N. Y.
September 8 and 9, 1922


John T. Morrison's history continued:
Tryon County and Sir William Johnson

Every student of history is familiar with the details of the battles of Bennington and Bemis Heights; how Sir John Burgoyne, his Britons, Germans, Canadians and Indians, were checked by Gates. Arnold and Morgan on the heights of Saratoga, how the British forces were routed, the entire army of Burgoyne, including the commander, made prisoners; and how Sir Henry Clinton, after reaching Livingston Manor, and hearing of the fate of Burgoyne and his army made a hasty retreat to New York.

Thus ended the efforts of the British Ministry for taking possession of the Mohawk Valley and the valleys of the Hudson and Lake Champlain. On the surrender of Burgoyne the invaders were compelled to evacuate Ticonderoga and Crown Point. The surrender of Burgoyne, the retreat of Clinton, and the abortive attempt to take Fort Stanwix, marked the turning point of the war in favor of the American. It inspirited the patriots, revived the credit of the Continental Government; the armies were rapidly recruited, and public opinion in Europe set strongly in favor of the struggling patriots. In less than four months after the surrender of Burgoyne France had formed a treat of alliance with the United States and acknowledged their independence.

The limits of this sketch will not permit details in relation to subsequent attacks and invasions of the Mohawk Valley and Tryon County, and of the awful scenes enacted by the torch, the tomahawk, and the scalping knife, at Cherry Valley, Cobleskill, Springfield, Johnstown, Scoharie, Canajoharie, Fort Plain, Stone Arabia, Caughnawaga and other settlements. To those who desire further information of the gruesome details of these tragedies I recommend the following works: Losing's Field Book of the Revolution; Simms' Frontiersmen of New York; Simm's History of Scoharie County; Stone's Life of Brant; Documentary History of New York, edited by E. B. O'Callaghan, M.D. The minutest details of some of the most tragic events of the Revolution that occurred in Tryon County are set forth in these several books.

It is a notable fact that it was in Tryon County at the siege of Fort Stanwix that the Stars and Stripes were first unfurled to the breeze as a garrison flag after the design was adopted by a resolution of Congress, June 14th, 1777. When Johnson and his Royal Greens appeared the garrison was without a flag, but their pride, patriotism and ingenuity soon supplied one. Shirts were cut up to form the white stripes, bits of scarlet cloth were joined for the red, and the blue ground for the stars were composed of a portion of a cloth cloak belonging to Captain Abraham Swarthout, of Dutchess County, who was then at the fort. "Before sunset," says Lossing, "The curious mosaic-work standard, as precious to the beleaguered garrison as the most beautifully wrought flag of silk and needle-work, was floating over one of the bastions."

It was in Tyron County also that the first shot was fired in the Revolution west of the Hudson River. Alexander White, the Tory sheriff at Johnstown, had rendered himself particularly obnoxious to the patriots. The first liberty pole erected in the Mohawk Valley was at German Flats, and White, with a band of Loyalists, cut it down. A little later, under some trifling pretext at Caughnawaga, he arrested John Fonda, a pronounced Whig, and committed him to the jail at Johnstown. A band of Fonda's friends, to the number of fifty men, under the direction of Sampson Sammons, proceeded to the jail at night and by force released Fonda. From the jail they proceeded to the tavern of Gilbert Tice at the north-east corner of William and Clinton Streets where the sheriff was lodging and demanded his surrender. White looked out from the second story window, and probably recognizing the leader of the crowd, inquired -- "Is that you Sammons?" "Yes," was the prompt reply; upon which White discharged a pistol at the sturdy Whig, but happily without injury. The ball whizzed past Sammons' head and stick in the sill of the door. This shot was immediately returned by the discharge of some forty or fifty muskets at the sheriff, but the only effect was a slight wound in the breast - just sufficient to draw blood. The doors of the house were broken and White would have been taken, but at that moment a field gun was fired at the Hall by Sir John. This was known to be a signal for his retainers, the Scotch Highlanders, to rally in arms; and as they would muster a force of five hundred men in a very short time, the Whigs thought it was most prudent to disperse. White was subsequently deposed as sheriff by the Committee of Safety, and Colonel John Frey appointed in his place. White was immediately re-commissioned by Governor Tyron, but the Committee would not suffer him to reenter upon the duties of his office. On the contrary, the feeling of indignation against him ran so high, that he was obliged to fly. He made an effort to reach Canada, but was captured at Jessup's Landing on the Hudson River, taken to Albany and imprisoned. Shortly afterward he was released on parole and left the country.

It was in Tryon County, also, and within the present limits of the city of Johnstown, that the last engagement of the Revolution was fought, and, like the battle of New Orleans in the war of 1812, after peace had been declared. Corwallis had surrendered at Yorktown five days before but this was before the advent of telegraph or telephone, and news and information traveled slowly in those remote days.

From the very commencement of hostilities Sir John Johnson and his followers appeared to be stimulated by a peculiar and ever active principle of hatred and hostility against the Whigs of Tryon County, and the environs of the former seat of the baronet.

In the summer of 1781, at Buck's Island in the St. Lawrence River, a few miles below the foot of Lake Ontario, another expedition was secretly planned against Johnstown, and consisted of four companies of the second battalion of Sir John Johnson's regiment of Royal Greens, Colonel Butler's rangers, under the direction of Major Butler, his son, and two hundred Indians - numbering in all about one thousand men, under the command of Major Ross. This expedition was executed with such silent celerity that on the 24th of October the entire force appeared at Warrensbush, the small settlement on the south side of the Mohawk referred to in the opening of this sketch, "as though they had sprung up from the earth like the warriors from the dragon's teeth of Cadmus, full grown, and all in arms, in a single night." Word was immediately dispatched to Colonel Willett whose headquarters was at Fort Rensselaer about twenty miles west. On hearing the news of the unexpected invaders, Willett lost not a moment, and with such forces as were in the garrison, together with such additional recruits from the militia as could be collected, he started for Fort Hunter the same evening and by marching all night reached there early the following morning, where he learned that the enemy were already in occupation of Johnstown. Ross and Butler had crossed the Mohawk some distance below Tribes Hill the day before and moved thence directly upon Johnstown - killing and taking prisoners, and destroying buildings and cattle and whatsoever came in their way.

The invaders did not reach Johnstown until 12 o'clock noon. The main body of the forces avoided the town, marched round to the west, halting upon the grounds at Johnson Hall. The baggage wagons, however passed through the village, and their conductors were fired upon from the old jail then serving as a fortress with the result that one of the enemy was wounded.

Willett having crossed the river pushed on in pursuit with all possible expedition. Owing to the disparity of the respective forces Colonel Willett deemed it unwise to hazard an attack in front with his whole force. He therefore detached a small body of the Tryon County militia under command of Major Rowley for the purpose, by a circuitous march, of outflanking the enemy and falling upon his rear - thus attacking front and rear at the same time. Willett then advanced upon the enemy at the head of his column. Entering the open field at the north end of Johnson Hall, Willett displayed his right into line, and pressed Ross and Butler so closely as to compel them to retire within the fringe of a neighboring wood. Here a skirmishing was kept up, and at the same time the remainder of the Americans advanced briskly in two columns; the battle became spirited and general. The only field piece of the Americans was taken, and swiftly retaken. But just at this juncture the forces of Willett were seized with one of those causeless and unaccountable panics which render troops in battle little worse and useless, and the whole of the right wing turned about and fled and sought refuse in St. John's church in the village. Colonel Willett did his utmost to rally the panic-stricken men but in vain, and the Americans would have suffered an ignominious defeat were it not for the precautionary measure of Colonel Willett in directing Major Rowley to make an attack in the rear. Fortunately Rowley emerged from the woods just in time to fall upon the enemy's rear at the very moment of their exultation over an easy victory. That officer pressed the attack with great vigor and enterprise, while the enemy were engaged in making prisoners of stragglers, and the Indians were scalping those who unfortunately fell into their hands. The bloodthirsty fight was maintained with equal obstinacy for a considerable time, Early in the engagement Rowley was wounded by a shot through the ankle and carried from the field. The battle continued in this fashion until near sunset. Finding that Rowley's detachment alone as holding the forces of Ross and Butler at bay, Willett was able to restore spirit and confidence into his men, who returned to the battle-ground and mingled in the fight. The battle raged until dark when, pressed on all sides, the forces of Ross and Butler were routed, and in great consternation and confusion retreated to the woods, fleeing westerly in the direction of Oneida Lake. It was during the flight following this battle that the notorious Tory, Walter Butler, lost his life. He had just leaped into the West Canada creek, begging for mercy, when an Oneida Indian, one of his pursuers, plunged his tomahawk into the Tory's brain at the same time shrieking in his ear, "Remember Cherry Valley !!" The spot where Butler lost his life has since been known as "Butler's Ford." So ended the battle of Johnstown, the last and one of the bloodiest engagements in the war for American independence, and thus closed the dark and bloody chapter of the Revolutionary annals of Tryon County.

Governor Tyron rendered himself so odious to the patriots that in the fall of 1775 he fled from the wrath of the people and sought refuge on board a British ship-of-war in New York harbor, the Dutchess of Gordon. From that aquatic palace he attempted to rule the Providence, but the Provincial Congress was now governed by the popular will, and royal authority in New York was at an end forever. While aboard the Dutchess of Gordon, Tyron plotted the murder of Washington and his principal officers then stationed at Richmond Hill. He freely sent money ashore for that purpose. The Life Guard of Washington was tampered with and two of them seduced from their fidelity. To one of them, a man named Hickey, was entrusted the unspeakably foul task of destroying the great American commander-in-chief. Hickey knew that Washington was very fond of green peas, and planned to place a fatal dose of poison in the favorite dish, but was frustrated by the general's faithful housekeeper whom Hickey sought to make an accomplice, and who pretended to favor the plan but who forewarned Washington. Hickey watched the movements of the housekeeper through a half-opened door, and was amazed when the girl placed the poisoned peas before Washington to see the latter make some excuse and order the dish away. Hickey was arrested, found guilty, and hanged to a tree, June 28th, 1776, in the presence of fully twenty thousand people. This was the first military execution in the Continental army. The plot was traced directly to Governor Tryon as its author. This last nefarious offense cast the name of Tryon into such obloquy that in deference to public sentiment, on April 2nd, 1784, the Legislature changed the name of Tryon County to Montgomery County in honor of the gallant and brilliant young General Richard Montgomery, a hero of the battle of Quebec.

Following the opening of the Erie Canal travel and transportation were diverted from the turnpikes and stage-coach routes, and as a result Johnstown, the county seat of Montgomery County, went into a decline that lasted for more than twenty years. And the climax was reached by the abandonment of Johnstown as the shire town and the removal of the records to Fonda, which had been designated as the new county seat. This occasioned such bitterness of feeling, did such violence to historical sentiment, and feeling and excitement ran so high, that in deference to public opinion the Legislature on April 18, 1838, created a new county from the northerly section of Montgomery County, giving the new county the name of Fulton, in honor of Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamship, and named Johnstown as the county seat.

Colonial Cemetery in West Green Street, containing
graves of many prominent Revolutionary officers
and soldiers

One hundred and fifty years have passed since the "setting up" of Tyron County, and the dedication of the ancient courthouse at Johnstown, the last one hundred of which represent the most progressive period in the world's history. In 1772, Tryon County and Johnstown stood in the fringe of the great western frontier; today there is no western frontier. Law and order and the light of civilization have spread over the continent and beyond - to the islands of the Pacific. In 1772 the State of New York or the United States had not come into being. Today the state of New York leads in population and wealth, and the federation of the United States represents the freest and most powerful government on the face of the globe. Not withstanding the present world turmoil, the social and industrial unrest that is prevalent, the strikes and crime waves and all over evils that prevail, emanating from a psychology that has survived the world war, this is the golden age of America. But to appreciate this fact, and the advantages that we who live in the present enjoy over those who lived a century or a century and a half ago, it is necessary to know something of the past; something about the suffering and sacrifices of those who have gone before, whose lives and influences were dedicated for human uplift, the betterment of the world and the happiness of mankind. A knowledge of history is useful and a boon if for no other purpose than to enable one to appreciate the comforts and blessings of today in contrast with the conditions of one hundred and one hundred and fifty years ago. Moreover, a knowledge of the history of a place, a city or a county, adds a charm and sentiment that does not exist in the absence of this knowledge, or with reference to places that have no history. The environment of the builders of America was crude, comfortless, anything but attractive. It was more than fifty years after the building of Tryon County court house at Johnstown before the first steamship crossed the ocean; more than eighty years before the first railroad was built; long, long years before coal or petroleum came into general use; when tallow candles and smoking whale oil lamps took the place of the light of day. There were no free schools in the sense of free schools of this day and generation. The masses were ignorant - illiterate. The total population of the United States a century ago was less than ten million; today it is more than one hundred and ten million. It was less than a century ago that the chilled plow was invented; the grain of the farmer was threshed by a flail and winnowed by the wind. The great combination reaper and mower were not invented until 1834. The people of one hundred years ago did not turn a switch when they wanted a light, or turn a valve when they were in need of heat and warmth. Fires had to be kept burning; friction matches did not come into use until 1836. The telegraph, the telephone and the typewriter were unthought of. Steel pens and not been invented; writing was done with a quill. There were no labor laws, or any restrictions on labor. Women and children engaged in drudgery from sun to sun. The knowledge of medicine was meager. The physicians were not graduates of colleges or medical schools, and knew only what they picked up by observation and experiment. Antiseptics were unknown, and plagues, fevers and epidemics, exacting a fearful toll of human life, were frequent. The great cure-all was blood-letting; they bled a patient for practically all the ills that human flesh is heir to. The great Washington suffered an attack of acute edematous laryngitis - inflammation of the upper part of the wind-pipe. He was blistered and bled, given and emetic and cathartic, treated for everything except his affliction. They took enough blood from him to kill a strong and normal man - no wonder he died. These are but a few of the facts which suggest to our minds the advantages that we who were born to live in the Twentieth century enjoy over those who lived and labored in America amid the pioneer and crude conditions of the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth centuries. But those brave and sturdy pioneers paved the way. By their patience, their toil and perseverance, their courage and many homely virtues, they bequeathed a rich legacy to posterity, and we of this generation are the present beneficiaries. Let us show our appreciation, our gratitude, by keeping alive in our minds and memory kindly thoughts and remembrances toward those brave souls who fought on the right side, on the side of progress and righteousness and let us on all appropriate and fitting occasions offer just and proper panegyric to those heroes who lived and labored, who braved hardships and death in order that the world might be freer and better.

  

"History of Tryon County in Pageantry"

Characters of One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago Reincarnate Through Prominent Men
and Women of Johnstown and Gloversville -- Entire Pageant Planned and Developed
by Mrs. Bethune M. Grant, Jr. and Mrs. Charles B. Knox -- Pageant Director, Julius E. Warren.

  

Friday

Prologue..............Miss Bessie C. McClain
Pages...................Campbell Doubleday, Kenneth Lyke
Narrator..............J. Ellsworth Stille

1:00 P. M.

Prologue

If an artist were painting the history of Johnstown, he would require a canvas of infinite length, and his picture would reveal almost endless variety of action and color.  it would show us the hardy pioneers who entered this tractless wilderness and built up, with their own hands, brains and hearts, on this high land north of the Mohawk, a pleasant village.  Their struggles, their laborious work and their hardships, their early encounters with the Indians, from a magnificent beginning for this picture of early Johnstown.  These men and women, in a sense, opened up the great gateway to the West.  This was frontier country as truly as was Plymouth Rock.

The next scene has as its background the same low-lying hills, the same streams and valleys, but now they are flooded with the sunshine of prosperity and happiness.  The farms are cleared, streams are turning mill wheels, the fields are plowed and roads are built stretching out towards the Atlantic coast, to the East and South and even on to the West and Canada in the North.  In this vista one figure stands out above all the rest, that of the man who has given Johnstown her name, he, who by his genius, his vision, his leadership, among men, and his generosity, made this obscure settlement a real power in the colonies and in the world of his time.

It is Tryon county that we honor today but it is Johnstown which gave birth to Tryon County that must receive our greatest tribute.  The Johnstown of 1772, an outpost of civilization and yet a prosperous village of spacious homes and of wide shaded streets, these same streets that we walk today; Johnstown visited by the great of this continent and of Europe; Johnstown, the seat of old Tryon County, famed for its delightful people and its charming hospitality.

It was not all peace even in this scene.  No locality in this country perhaps has a more thrilling and harrowing story to tell.  There was ever the terror and the shadow of the Red Man in the background.  Here, scenes of pillage and slaughter were enacted such as has never been dreamed of.  There, men and women performed deeds of great courage and bravery.  There was the dark and doubtful period of the French and Indian War in which Sir William and the men of Tryon played an important part; and later there was to come the suspicion, the treachery and the tragedy of a town divided against itself in the days of the Revolution.


But this is a pageant of peace, a reliving of scenes and people who lived one hundred and fifty years ago in this very setting where we walk today.  Too often our histories have told only of great events "that tried men's souls", of deeds that rocked nations from their depths, and have said little of the ways and manners of living and of fine simple lives of the people who made such a community as this possible.  It is those people and this sturdy, strong "north" country in times of peace that contribute our pageant painting today.  It is the belief of those who have conceived this picture, that history is being lived again, in the personalities and characters that will people our streets, that these simple incidents and ancient customs revived today are as truly a part of our heritage as the great events of a Revolution or a Civil War.

Julius E. Warren

Scene I - At the Johnstown Jail, June 1772 (Corner of Perry, Montgomery and Prospect Streets.)

Fulton County Jail, erected 1772 by Sir William
Johnson, used as fortress during the Revolution;
(insert) Fort Johnson

Characters

Sheriff White..............................................Sheriff Lee H. Ingram
Sheriff's Wife...............................................Miss Helen B. Ingram
The Old Turkey..........................................Louis B. Wolfe
constable...................................................Under Sheriff Frank Keaveney
John Fonda, 
Tax Collector of Caugnawaga...........Giles B. Fonda (Direct descendant of John Fonda)
Thomas Hunt, Complainant.................Harold B. Northup
Two Quaker Women, 
Citizens, Neighbors...................................Everett Karg, Mayor Percy A. Ripton, Edward Grimes,  
                                                         Mrs. Miles Betts, Mrs. Herbert C. Roberts, James Scovil, Katherine 
                                                         Hagadorn, Dorothy Wilms, Marguerite Anthony.

1:30 P. M.

Scene II  - At the Black Horse Tavern (Corner of William and Montgomery Streets)

Part I

Jimmie Burke, Innkeeper..............................James E. Knox
Mistress Burke...................................................Mrs. James E. Knox
Guests................................................................Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. MacIntyre, Mr. and Mrs.
                                                                  Archibald Doubleday, Mrs. Leonard W. Grant, Mr. and Mrs.
                                                                  Edward C. Wells
Bar Maids...........................................................Miss Florence Lambert, Mrs. Everett E. Karg
The Village Musician.......................................John Putman
A Strolling Singer..............................................Leonard W. Grant
Edward Aken, Quaker...................................John E. Hagadorn
Loafers.................................................................John Joyce, Floyd Bradt
Singers.................................................................Leslie Houck, Sterling Holley, George Hunt, 
                                                                  Franklyn Brown

Part II

Governor Tryon and other distinguished guests arrive in Johnstown. 

Governor William Tryon..................................Judge T. Cuthell Calderwood
Lady Tryon.........................................................Mrs. John L. Potter
James DeLancey.............................................Dr. C. T. Lansing
Philip Schuyler...................................................George C. Potter
George Washington, of Virginia.................S. Elmore Burton
Charles Carroll of Carrollton........................Fred Linus Carroll
Ladies.................................................................Mrs. S. E. Trumbull, Miss Kate Yanney

The antique carriages used in this scene are loaned by Mrs. E. L. Henry and Mr. Jacob Spraker.  The Governor's carriage once belonged to Colonel Gansevoort and was used by him and his guest, General George Washington, in the city of Albany.  The smaller carriage was used by Governor Bouck when he came to Johnstown to call upon his friend W. H. Livingston.  The antique surrey was bought in New York city when Mr. Joseph Spraker, grandfather of the present owner and his bride went on their honeymoon trip one hundred and twenty-five years ago.

The large traveling carriage was owned by the DeGraff family and is now in the possession  of the Johnstown Historical Society.

When Governor Tryon came to dedicate the Court House, September 8, 1772, he stopped at the old Gambrel-roofed Tavern which stood on the north-east corner of William and Clinton streets.  This was owned and conducted by Major Gilbert Tice, who fled to Canada with his Tory friends during the Revolution.  Because of its unsafe condition the old tavern was torn down more than sixty years ago.  LaFayette slept in the Tice tavern when he visited Johnstown in 1778.

The Black Horse Tavern was built soon after the Revolution and in 1793 was sold to James burke who named "Jimmy Burke's Inn."  It was purchased in 1812 by Isaiah Younglove and became the home of the Younglove family.  it is now the property of Miss Susanna Younglove.

Two of the earliest settlers in Johnstown were Jacob Boshart and Henry Yanney who came here in1756.  They built log cabins on the opposite side of the road from the fine colonial residence, now the home for several generations of their descendants.

The Yanney homestead one mile south of the Court House was built by Henry Yanney in 1796 and opened to the public as the "Black Horse Tavern."  It was known and used as such until the year 1830.  It stood on the only road connecting Johnstown with the valley at the time.  The largest barn in this section was built by Mr. Yanney in 1795 and during Court week for hte vast territory of Montgomery county, when this was, as now, the county seat, the barn and house both overflowed; horses were stabled under the trees and their owners slept in the halls of the Tavern.

2:15 P. M.

Scene III -- At the Court House:  Dedication of the Tryon County Court House, 
September 8, 1772.

The characters for this scene will reach Court House Square from several directions.

A. From Union Hall:
Captain Jean Baptiste Vaumann De Fon Claire, builder
of Union Hall............................................Lucien de Chatelaine
An Indian Maiden.................................Miss Dorothy Dempster
Capt. John Drogue...............................Floyd Monahan
Penelope Grant.....................................Mrs. Robert L. Dawson
Nick Stoner, Trapper.............................Grover E. Yerdon
Joseph Balch, Trapper.........................John Soules

B.  From Court House:
Guy Johnson, Judge..............................Judge William C. Mills
John Butler, Judge................................Bethune M. Grant, Jr.
Peter Conyne, Judge...........................Attorney Lee S. Anibal
Sir John Johnson, Knight......................John W. Vaughn
Assistant Judges---
Daniel Claus............................................Judge William S. Cassedy
John Wells................................................Attorney McIntyre Fraser
Capt. Jelles Fonda................................Max M. Wilms
A Singer....................................................Arthur N. Yanney
Singers.......................................................Sons of St. George

C.  From the Baronial Mansion:
Sir William Johnson.................................Arthur B. Wassung
Walter Butler, Secretary to
Sir William.................................................George W. Randall
Attendants

D. From the Black Horse Tavern:
Governor Tryon and Attendants

E.  From The Drumm House:
Edward Wall, Schoolmaster...............John T. Morrison
School Children......................................Class of 1922, Gloversville High School

  

3:45 P. M.

Scene IV -- At Johnson Hall.  "The Indian Council" and attendant ceremonies.

Characters:
Sir William Johnson, Major-General of the British Forces in 
North America.....................................Arthur B. Wassung
Walter Butler.........................................George W. Randall
Guy Johnson........................................Judge William C. Mills
Sir John Johnson.................................John W. Vaughn
Capt. Jelles Fonda.............................Max M. Wilms
John Butler...........................................Bethune M. Grant, Jr.
Molly Brant and Children.................Mrs. Emma Steele and Children
Joseph Brant.......................................Jacob Miller
An Indian Chief..................................Chief Deskaheh
Red Jacket..........................................Harley Wilson
A Courier..............................................Henry Gage (Lineal descendant of Nick Stoner)
British officers.......................................Frank L. Rogers, Frank Hanson, Albert Carpenter,
                                                      George M. Humphrey, Edgar D. Gordon
Sir William's Cook and Waiters........William B. White, Edward Carroll, Malcolm McMartin,
                                                      Duncan Fraser, Robert Thyne, James McIntyre

Soldiers and Scouts
Citizens
Servants
Indians.................................................Members of Arietta and Nipmuck tribes, I. O. O. R. M.,
                                                     Kolaneka and Na-no-nee Councils, D. of P.
Ladies and Gentlemen

Note:  The grouping in this scene is arranged from a historical painting by e. l. Henry, owned by Mrs. Charles B. Knox of Johnstown.

  

Epilogue

Our revels now are ended.  These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind.  We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

--  Shakespeare

  

On to Part III:   More of the Pageant, "Historic Johnstown" and
Committees for Celebration

  


Return to Fulton County NYGenWeb

NYGenWeb

Copyright , 2002 Peggy Menear, Jeanette Shiel
All Rights Reserved.


Last updated Tuesday, 13-May-2008 13:14:33 PDT


Server space is generously provided by RootsWeb.