"A HISTORY OF FULTON COUNTY IN THE REVOLUTION"

By James F. Morrison


THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR STORY

JACOB APPLY: KILLED AT EPHRATAH

    Jacob served as a private in Captain Nicholas Rechtor's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Second Regiment) while living at Tilleborough (Ephratah). It is not known when Jacob enlisted but he was serving under Captain Rechtor in 1779.

    On April 20, 1779, a party of nine Indians entered the Tilleborough settlement. Captain Nicholas Rechtor with his company were drilling at the time the enemy appeared in the settlement.

    The Indians now headed for the home of Henry Hart. A daughter of Hart on seeing the Indians approaching stole away to the place where Captain Rechtor and his men were assembled. While the Hart girl was gone, her father's home was attacked and he was killed and the Indians then set it on fire. The Indians now proceeded to Jacob Apply's house.

    The Indians burned Apply's house and proceeded to Captain Rechtor's house. Captain Rechtor with Jacob Apply, Peter Shite and two other men went with Rechtor to his house. The other militiamen ran to their homes to protect their families.

    On reaching the Rechtor house they found Henry, Rechtor's youngest son playing and the Indians killed and scalped him. The Indians now proceeded to the house and took Mrs. Rechtor prisoner. Just then Captain Rechtor with his men arrived and fired at the Indians. Two of the Indians were killed and Mrs. Rechtor was accidentally wounded in the leg and the Indians returned the fire. Captain Rechtor was hit in the arm, Peter Shite was wounded in the elbow and Jacob Apply was killed.

    The Indians retreated into the woods thinking that they were outnumbered but one of their party was still in the house. Rechtor with his men on reaching the house found the Indian but he rushed them and broke through them and escaped but was severely wounded. Captain Rechtor with his wife, and the militiamen went to Fort Paris where their wounds were cared for.

    On April 21st, Captain Peter Wagner Jr. with about twenty men went in pursuit of the enemy but they were too far ahead and the chase was given up. Captain Wagner and his men gathered the bodies of Hart, Apply and the Rechtor boy and took their bodies back to Fort Paris.

Hart and the Rechtor boy were buried near the fort and William Loucks, Apply's father-in-law, took his son-in-law's body back to the Loucks farm and buried him there.

ZEPHENIAH BATCHELLER: SERVES IN COMPANY OF EXEMPTS

    In the summer of 1776, Zepheniah enlisted while living in Johnstown as a Lieutenant in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associated Exempts in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). Zepheniah served as a Lieutenant in this company until the end of the war and he was stationed at Fort Paris and Fort Johnstown.
On October 24, 1781, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer on learning of this invasion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what troops that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

    In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left the fort in pursuit of the enemy. Captain John Little who was in command at Fort Johnstown on being informed of this invasion organized a scouting party to go in search of signs of the enemy. Zepheniah under Captain Little with eleven other men left the fort in search of the enemy.

    Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major Ross and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen Shew then on sentry duty fired at them and the men in the fort turned out to defend it. After a few minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain Little and his scouting party. Captain Little ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and his men would follow the enemy.

    Shortly after the garrison returned to the fort, Colonel Willett and his men arrived. The garrison informed Colonel Willett what had happened and that the enemy were encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. Just as Colonel Willett and his trooped arrived on the field, Captain Little and his men fell in with the rear guard of the enemy.

    Captain Little was hit in the right shoulder with a musket ball and the scouting party with their wounded captain took to the woods to find cover. Here another brief exchange of musket fire took place and Sergeant John Eikler was killed here. The scouting party now joined Willett on the battlefield. The battle raged until the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating. Zepheniah now returned to Fort Johnstown where he was stationed until the end of the war.

    Zepheniah also served as a Justice of the Peace during war and he also served as a Justice for several years after the war.

JEREMIAH CROWLEY: TAKEN PRISONER AT JOHNSTOWN

    Jeremiah served as a private in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associated Exempts in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Third Regiment) while living at Johnstown. When Jeremiah enlisted is not known but was serving an enlistment in 1781.

    On October 24, 1781, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer on learning of this invasion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what men that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

    In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett with his men left Fort Rensselaer in pursuit of the enemy. Captain John Little who was in command at Fort Johnstown on learning of this invasion picked twelve men and left the fort in search of the enemy.

    Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major Ross and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen Shew then on sentry duty fired at them and the men in the fort turned out to defend it. After a few minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison including Jeremiah pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain Little and his scouting party. Captain Little ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and the scouting party would follow the enemy.

    Shortly after the garrison had returned to the fort, Colonel Willett and his men arrived. The garrison informed Captain Willett what had happened and that the enemy had encamped near Johnson's Hall. Jeremiah under Colonel Willett left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall.

    On Colonel Willett and his men arriving at Johnson's Hall, they charged the enemy and a battle now raged. The battle ended with the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating. In the heat of the battle Jeremiah was taken prisoner and soon afterwards learned that his stepson William Scarborough had been killed. Jeremiah was taken to Canada until he was released on November 9, 1782.

BENJAMIN DELINE: TAKEN PRISONER IN 1780

    Benjamin served while living at Fonda's Bush (Broadalbin) as a Lieutenant in Captain Emanuel DeGraff's Company (Seventh Company) in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). It is not known when Benjamin enlisted or how long he served in this company but it was between 1776 and 1778.

    In the spring of 1778, Benjamin enlisted as a Lieutenant in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. Benjamin was stationed at various times at Fort Johnstown.

    In the fall, Benjamin and Joseph Scott moved into Johnson's Hall to take up residence there.

    In the spring of 1779, Benjamin again enlisted in Captain Little's Company.

    In the first part of April, Sergeant Solomon Woodworth, Sergeant Henry Shew and Benjamin learned that a Loyalist by the name of John Helmer* had been hiding at his father's home (Philip Helmer) in Fonda's Bush. On April 11th, Benjamin with his two friends decided to take Helmer prisoner. That night the Patriots waited for Helmer near his father's house and on his approaching the house they took him prisoner. The Patriots took Helmer back to Johnstown and put him in the jail at Fort Johnstown.

    On May 22, 1780, Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists burned the Mohawk Valley. Johnson marched to Johnson's Hall to retrieve some valuable papers that he had buried in May of 1776 when he had to flee to Canada. Benjamin and Scott were taken prisoners by Johnson's men and they were taken to Canada. Benjamin was held prisoner until the end of the war in 1783.

*John Helmer was a private in Colonel Sir John Johnson's Battalion of the King's Royal New York Regiment. Helmer was in the area to take recruits back to Canada.

JOHN NICHOLAS DOCKSTADER: ENLISTED IN 1775

    John enlisted as a private in the summer of 1775 while living at Johnstown in Captain John James Davis' Company (Second Company) in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

    On August 3, 1777, the garrison at Fort Schuyler was completely surrounded and besieged. The fort was besieged by British Regulars, Loyalists, and Indian troops under Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger.

    Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer on receiving news of this invasion, ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton. John, under Captain Davis and Colonel Visscher, joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton. On August 4th the relief column marched out of the fort on their way to Fort Schuyler.

    On August 6th, about ten o'clock in the morning in a ravine near Oriskany Creek the relief column was ambushed by British and Indian troops under Colonel Sir John Johnson and Colonel John Butler. The battle lasted until late in the afternoon when a sortie from the fort under Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus Willett attacked the enemy encampments near the fort. The enemy at Oriskany on hearing musket and cannon fire near their encampments in their rear retreated back to their encampments to investigate the cause of the musket and cannon fire.

    The relief column started to gather their wounded and some of the dead. Colonel Visscher was wounded, John VanAntwerp Jr., and Adam Miller were also wounded and Captain Davis was killed. The remnants of the relief column marched back to the Oneida Indian Village at Oriskany and spent the night there. In the morning of August 7th, the relief column started on their return march to Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. The relief column reached these forts on August 9th.

    On the death of Captain Davis at Oriskany, First Lieutenant Abraham Veeder was appointed Captain of the Second Company in September of 1777.

    John served under Captain Vedder during the remainder of 1777 and re-enlisted in Vedder's Company in the spring of 1778. John at different times also served in Captain Robert Abraham Yates' Company (Third Company) in Colonel Visscher's Regiment.

    On one occasion while going to Fort Schuyler as an express, John ran into a party of Indians who fired at him but he escaped unharmed and he reached Fort Schuyler without another incident occurring.

    On October 24, 1781, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer (Fort Plain) on learning of this incursion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he gathered what troops that were at Fort Rensselaer and in the morning of October 25th went in pursuit of the enemy.

    John with several others joined Colonel Willett after he crossed the Mohawk River at Caughnawaga and pursued the enemy to the Village of Johnstown. On reaching Fort Johnstown in Johnstown Colonel Willett was informed by the garrison that Major Ross and his men had encamped near Johnson's Hall.

    Colonel Willett left Fort Johnstown and immediately marched to the enemy's encampment and attacked them. Now a fierce battle was raging and it did not end until the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating.

    John, during the heat of the battle, had a musket ball pass through his hat. John, under Lieutenant-Colonel Volkert Veeder, joined Colonel Willett at Fort Dayton and on October 28th they left Fort Dayton again in pursuit of Major Ross and his son.

    On October 30th, Colonel Willett and his men fell in with the rear guard of the enemy at West Canada Creek under Captain Butler. After several minutes of kirmishing, the enemy retreated. On crossing the West Canada Creek Captain Butler was found seriously wounded but an Oneida Indian named Anthony tomahawked and scalped him. Eight more Butler's Rangers were also found dead.

    John married Darus Vanderwerker on October 11, 1771, at the Dutch Reformed Church at Stone Arabia by the Reverend Abraham Rosencrantz. John died in 1811.

EBENEZER DUNHAM: MOVES TO FORT JOHNSTOWN

    In April of 1778, Ebenezer, while living at Mayfield, enlisted as a private in Captain Samuel Ross' Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Third Regiment).

    Ebenezer went out on a scout under Sergeant Solomon Woodworth and after a few days they returned to Fort Johnstown. Ebenezer with his brother John moved into Fort Johnstown where they were stationed.

    In the end of June, Ebenezer enlisted as a private in Captain Andrew Wemple's Company (Eighth Company) in Colonel Visscher's Regiment.

    In April of 1779, a party of Indians on passing the Dunham home saw Jacob and his son Samuel chopping a tree in a field and attacked them. Jacob and Samuel were killed and the Indians rushed to the house and found that Mrs. Dunham with the rest of the children had fled into the woods. The Indians then plundered the house and then left for Canada.
Mrs. Dunham with her children went to Johnstown and on reaching Fort Johnstown she informed Captain John Little what had happened. Sergeant Woodworth gathered a party of men and went to the Dunham home and buried Jacob and Samuel and then went in pursuit of the enemy. Ebenezer and John remained at the fort to take care of their mother and brothers.

    In the spring of 1780, Ebenezer again enlisted in Captain Wemple's Company and he was again stationed at Fort Johnstown. On May 22nd, Colonel Sir John Johnson with 500 Indians and Loyalists laid waste to Caughnawaga and marched to Johnson's Hall to retrieve some personal effects that were buried when he left in 1776. Captain Wemple deserted and joined Johnson and went with him back to Canada.

    Ebenezer, with the rest of the garrison, were unable to attack Johnson for they were too few and they feared for the safety of the prisoners that he had with him. Johnson and his men escaped back to Canada without further incident.
Ebenezer in June, enlisted as a private in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. Ebenezer again was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    In the spring of 1781, Ebenezer again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown. On September 9th, Ebenezer received the sad news that his brother John was killed in an ambush near Fort Dayton on September 7th.

    Ebenezer served in Captain Little's Company and at Fort Johnstown until the end of 1783. Ebenezer also served at various times in Captain Emanuel DeGraff's Company (Seventh Company) in Colonel Visscher's Regiment.

JOHN DUNHAM: SERVES WITH SOLOMON WOODWORTH

    John enlisted in the spring of 1778, while living in Mayfield, as a private in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). John with his brother Ebenezer moved to Fort Johnstown where they were stationed.

    In the spring of 1779, John again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.
On April 11th, a party of Indians on passing the Dunham home saw Jacob and his son Samuel chopping a tree in a field and attacked them. Jacob and Samuel were killed and the Indians rushed to the house and found that Mrs. Dunham with the rest of the children had fled into the woods. The Indians then plundered the house and then left for Canada. Mrs. Dunham with her children went to Johnstown and on reaching Fort Johnstown she informed Captain John Little what had happened. Sergeant Solomon Woodworth gathered a party of men and went to the Dunham home and buried Jacob and Samuel and then went in pursuit of the enemy. Ebenezer and John remained at the fort to take care of their mother and brothers.

    In April of 1780, John enlisted as a sergeant in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel John Harper's Regiment of New York State Levies.

    John was stationed at Fort Plain, Herkimer, House, Paris, Plank and Johnstown. John was discharged at Fort Herkimer on January 1, 1781.

    In April of 1781, John enlisted as a private in Captain Lawrance Gros' Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies. John was stationed at Fort Rensselaer (Fort Plain).

    On September 6th, John under Captain Woodworth left Fort Rensselaer and marched to Fort Dayton where they spent the night. In the morning of September 7th, John under Captain Woodworth went out on a scout along the West Canada Creek.

    After marching about then miles the scouting party fell into an ambush by a party of Indians and Loyalists under Lieutenant Jacob Clement. After about ten minutes of fighting Captain Woodworth, Sergeant Dunham and twenty three others were killed. Seven men were taken prisoners and about fifteen escaped back to Fort Dayton.

    On September 8th, Captain Garret Putman with his company and some of the survivors from the ambush of the day before returned to the site of the ambush and buried Dunham and the others in one grave and then they returned to Fort Dayton.

 

The above is from pages 16-19 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution, and typed by dedicated volunteer,  Peggy Menear.  A copy of this book can found at the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives in Fonda, New York.  Peggy is researching her Chatterton line from the Mohawk Valley.  If you have any connection to or information about the Chatterton's, she would love to hear from you.

 

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