"A HISTORY OF FULTON COUNTY IN THE REVOLUTION"

By James F. Morrison


THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR STORY

JAMES DUNN: SERVES AS PRIVATE

    In the spring of 1778, James enlisted as a private in Captain John LITTLE's Company in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) while living at Johnstown. It is not known how long James served in Captain LITTLE's Company but he probably served at least three months every year until 1783.

JOHN DUNN: ENLISTS AT JOHNSTOWN 

    In the spring of 1778, John while living at Johnstown enlisted as a private in Captain John LITTLE's Company in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). It is not known how long John served in Captain LITTLE's Company but he probably served at least three months every year until 1783.

JOHN EIKLER: PURSUES INDIANS

    In the spring of 1778, John enlisted while living at Fish House (Northampton) as a corporal in Captain John LITTLE's Company in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). John was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    In the spring of 1779, John enlisted as a sergeant in Captain LITTLE's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    In the spring of 1780, John again enlisted in Captain LITTLE's Company. On March 28th, the Sacondaga Blockhouse was attacked by a party of seven Indians. John under Sergeant Solomon WOODWORTH and four other men went in pursuit of the enemy. On April 1st, WOODWORTH and his men came upon the enemy encampment.

    The Indians fired at the militiamen but they missed and they were at the mercy of their captors. WOODWORTH killed two Indians and the other militiamen shot the other three Indians. Two more of the Indians were out hunting. The dead Indians were stripped and the militiamen returned to Fort Johnstown.

    In May, John enlisted as a corporal in Captain Garret PUTMAN's Company in Colonel John HARPER's Regiment of New York State Levies. John was stationed at Fort Herkimer and Fort Rensselaer. He was discharged on January 1, 1781.

    In the spring of 1781, John enlisted as a sergeant in Captain's LITTLE's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    On October 24th, Major John ROSS and Captain Walter BUTLER with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley killing and burning. Colonel Marinus WILLETT, who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, on learning of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what men that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

    In the morning of October 25th, Colonel WILLETT and his men left the fort in pursuit of the enemy. Captain LITTLE at Fort Johnstown on being informed of the invasion organized a scouting party to go in search of signs of the enemy. John under Captain LITTLE with eleven other men left the fort in search of the enemy.

    Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major ROSS and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen SHEW, then on sentry duty, fired at them and the men in the fort turned out to defend the fort. After a few minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain LITTLE and his scouting party. Captain LITTLE ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and his men would follow the enemy.

    Shortly after the garrison returned to the fort, Colonel WILLETT and his men arrived. The garrison informed Colonel WILLETT what had happened and that the enemy were encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel WILLETT and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. Just as Colonel WILLETT and his troops arrived on the field, Captain LITTLE and his men fell in with the rear guard of the enemy.

    Captain LITTLE was hit in the right shoulder with a musket ball and the scouting party with their wounded captain took to the woods to find cover. Here another brief exchange of musket fire took place and John was killed. The scouting party now joined WILLETT on the battlefield.

    The battle raged until the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating. Now the militiamen started to gather the wounded and the dead. A large grave was dug and a mass burial was performed.

HENRY HART: KILLED BY INDIANS

    Henry served as a private in Colonel Jacob KLOCK's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment) while living at Ephratah. It is not known when Henry enlisted or what company he enlisted in but he was serving in 1778 in Colonel KLOCK's Regiment.

    On April 20, 1778, a party of nine Indians attacked the Tilleborough (Ephratah) settlement. The Indians on entering the settlement headed for the home of Henry. A daughter of HART's on seeing the Indians approaching stole away. The HART girl headed for the spot where Captain Nicholas RECHTOR and his company were performing military drills. On arriving there she informed Captain RECHTOR that a party of Indians were at her father's house.

    Meanwhile the Indians attacked HART's house, and they tomahawked and scalped Henry and then set his house on fire. The Indians proceeded to Jacob APPLY's house and they also set it on fire. The Indians now headed for Captain RECHTOR's house.

    Captain RECHTOR with Jacob APPLY, Peter SHITE and two other men headed for RECHTOR's house. The rest of the men ran to their homes to protect their families. On reaching RECHTOR's house the Indians killed Henry, RECHTOR's youngest son and on entering the house they took Mrs. RECHTOR prisoner.

    Just then Captain RECHTOR and his men arrived and they fired at the Indians and killed two of them, and Mrs. RECHTOR was accidentally wounded. The Indians now returned the fire and Captain RECHTOR, Peter SHITE were wounded and Jacob APPLY was killed. The Indians left thinking that they were outnumbered, but the retreating Indians didn't know that one of their party was still in the house.

    On reaching the house the militiamen were rushed by the Indian and the Indian escaped but he was severely wounded. Captain RECHTOR with his wife went to Fort Paris where their wounds were taken care of. The next day a party of men under Captain Peter WAGNER, Jr., brought the bodies of HART, APPLY, and RECHTOR's son back to Fort Paris. HART and RECHTOR's son were buried at the fort and APPLY was buried on William LOUCK's farm, APPLY's father-in-law.

HENRY KELLY: KILLED IN 1778

    In the spring of 1776, Henry, while living at Mayfield, enlisted as a private in Captain Emanuel DEGRAFF's Company (Seventh Company) in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

    In the spring of 1777, Henry again enlisted in Captain DEGRAFF's Company.

    In the spring of 1778, Henry enlisted as a private in Captain John LITTLE's Company in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment.

    On June 2nd, Lieutenant John ROSS with about 300 Indians and Loyalists were raiding the Sacondaga settlements. Later that day a party of Indians decided to burn the grist mill in Mayfield tended by Henry and his wife.

    KELLY and his wife on seeing the Indians approach the mill attempted to escape into the woods. On attempting to reach the woods Henry was shot down by his wife's side, but she escaped into the woods. The Indians then returned to the grist mill and set it on fire.

    After the Indians had left, Mrs. KELLY started on her way to Fort Johnstown, and on arriving there she informed Captain LITTLE what had happened.

LEONARD KRETZER: SERVES AS CORPORAL

    On August 8, 1776, Leonard enlisted while living at Ephratah as a corporal in Captain Christian GETMAN's Company of Tryon County Rangers.

    In the middle of January of 1777, Leonard under Captain GETMAN and Colonel Ebenezer COX, marched to Fort Ticonderoga where he was stationed. On March 24th, Leonard, under Captain GETMAN marched out of Fort Ticonderoga on their way to Johnstown. They reached Johnstown on March 27th where the company was discharged.

    In April, Leonard enlisted as a corporal in Captain Nicholas RECHTOR's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob KLOCK's regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment).

    In the spring of 1778, Leonard enlisted as a private in Captain John LEFFLER's Company of Boatmen. They were employed in transporting supplies up the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers for American forts along those rivers. He was discharged on January 1, 1779.

    In April of 1779, Leonard again enlisted in Captain RECHTOR's Company. On April 20th, Ephratah was attacked by a party of nine Indians. Captain RECHTOR's arm was shattered by a musket ball, Mrs. RECHTOR was hit in the leg, and RECHTOR's youngest son Henry was killed. Captain RECHTOR shortly after this tragic incident moved to Albany with his family.

    Leonard enlisted as a private in Captain Henry MILLER's Company (Third Company) in Colonel KLOCK's Regiment. Leonard was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

    In April of 1780, Leonard enlisted as a private in Captain John CASSELMAN's Company of Tryon County Rangers attached to Colonel KLOCK's Regiment. Leonard was again stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River. Leonard was discharged on January 1, 1781.

    In the spring of 1781, Leonard again enlisted in Captain MILLER's Company. He was again stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

    In April of 1782, Leonard enlisted as a private in Captain Abner FRENCH's Company in Colonel Marinus WILLETT's Regiment of New York State levies. Leonard was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River. He was discharged on January 1, 1783.

    Leonard married Elizabeth COOK (KHULE) the daughter of Philip COOL on January 6, 1784. Leonard died on April 13, 1828.

LODOWICK KRING: STATIONED AT FORT TICONDEROGA

    Lodowick enlisted in the summer of 1775 as a corporal while living at Ephratah in Captain Nicholas RECHTOR's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob KLOCK's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment).

    In the middle of January of 1776, Lodowick under Captain RECHTOR and Colonel KLOCK, marched to Caughnawaga and joined General Philip SCHUYLER and his army that was encamped there. General SCHUYLER was corresponding with Sir John JOHNSON at Johnson's Hall in an attempt to have JOHNSON side with the Continental Congress or to at least remain neutral. After several days of corresponding and on being unable to reach an agreement with JOHNSON, General SCHUYLER with the Albany County and Tryon County Militia marched to the Village Of Johnstown. JOHNSON and his retainers were forced to surrender all military arms and supplies and signed an agreement that they would not interfere with the local Committee of Safety or militia.

    Lodowick in the summer went with Colonel Goose VANSCHAICK (First New York Regiment) and Colonel Elias DAYTON (Third New Jersey Regiment) to the German Flatts to hold a meeting with the Indians of the Six Nations.

    A few days afterwards General SCHUYLER arrived and Colonel DAYTON and Colonel VANSCHAICK were ordered to move on to Herkimer and erect a fort at the place. After about two weeks of holding council with the Indians, Lodowick, under General SCHUYLER returned to Canajoharie acting as a guard for General SCHUYLER, where he was discharged and Lodowick returned home.

    On August 1st, Lodowick enlisted as a private in Captain Christian GETMAN's Company of Tryon County Rangers.

    In the first part of January of 1777, Lodowick under Captain GETMAN, Colonel Ebenezer COX, Majors John BLIVEN and John EISENLORD with about 200 men marched to Fort Ticonderoga where they were stationed.

    On March 24th, Lodowick under Captain GETMAN left Fort Ticonderoga and marched to the Village Of Johnstown. They reached Johnstown on March 27th, Lodowick with the rest of the company were discharged. Lodowick now re-enlisted as a corporal in Captain RECHTOR's Company.

    On August 3rd, the garrison at Fort Schuyler were completely surrounded and besieged by the army of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry ST. LEGER. Brigadier General Nicholas HERKIMER ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton. Lodowick under Captain RECHTOR and Colonel KLOCK joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton. On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to relieve Fort Schuyler.

    On August 6th, about 10 o'clock in the morning the relief column was ambushed in a ravine near Oriskany Creek. The battle lasted for several hours when a sortie was made from Fort Schuyler under Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus WILLETT into the enemy encampments near the fort. The enemy at Oriskany on hearing musket and cannon fire in their rear, retreated back to their encampments to investigate the cause of the commotion.

    The remnants of the relief column gathered their wounded and some of their dead and returned to the Oneida Indian Village at Oriskany. On the morning of August 7th, the relief column left the Indian Village on their way back to Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. They reached those forts on August 9th.

    In the spring of 1778, Lodowick again enlisted in Captain RECHTOR's Company. Lodowick was stationed at Fort Paris during most of the summer.

    On November 9th, Lodowick under Colonel KLOCK with about 200 men started on their march to reinforce the garrison at Fort Alden in Cherry Valley. Lodowick and the reinforcements did not reach Cherry Valley until November 12th and on their arrival they found the settlement in ruins. Many of the houses were still burning and they assisted in putting them out as well as help to gather the dead for burial. Lodowick returned home after about a week.

    In the spring of 1779, Lodowick again enlisted in Captain RECHTOR's Company. On April 20th, Ephratah (Tilleboro) was attacked by a party of nine Indians. Captain RECHTOR's arm was shattered by a musket ball. Mrs. RECHTOR was hit in the leg by a musket ball and RECHTOR's youngest sone Henry was killed. Shortly after this incident Captain RECHTOR and his family moved to Albany.

    Lodowick in May enlisted as a corporal in Captain Henry MILLER's Company (Third Company) in Colonel KLOCK's Regiment. Lodowick was stationed at Fort Paris.

    In the spring of 1780, Lodowick again enlisted in Captain MILLER's Company and he was stationed at Fort Paris.

    On October 19th, Colonel Sir John JOHNSON with about 500 Indians and Loyalists were in the Stone Arabia settlement burning and killing. General Robert VAN RENSSELAER ordered Colonel John BROWN who was in command at Fort Paris to take a detachment from the fort and attack JOHNSON and that he (VAN RENSSELAER) would cross the Mohawk River and come to his support. Lodowick under Colonel BROWN marched out of Fort Paris in search of the enemy. On finding JOHNSON and his men, Colonel BROWN and his men attacked them. After about fifteen minutes of fierce fighting Colonel BROWN and forty-five of his men were killed and the rest retreated. Lodowick and some others returned to Fort Paris while others crossed the Mohawk River and joined VAN RENSSELAER's growing army. Another battle was fought later that afternoon but JOHNSON was able to escape.

    In the spring of 1781, Lodowick again re-enlisted in Captain MILLER's Company and he was stationed at Fort Paris.

    On October 24th, Major John ROSS and Captain Walter BUTLER with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus WILLETT who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, on receiving word of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops. Colonel WILLETT gathered what troops that could be spared from the fort and in the morning of October 25th, Colonel WILLETT and his men started in pursuit of the enemy.

    The garrison at Fort Paris, on being informed of this invasion by the messenger sent by Colonel WILLETT, mustered and marched to meet Colonel WILLETT. Lodowick with some others mounted horses and rode to Caughnawaga where they joined Colonel WILLETT. Lodowick under Colonel WILLETT went to Fort Johnstown in the Village of Johnstown. On reaching Fort Johnstown, Colonel WILLETT was informed by the garrison that Major ROSS and his men were encamped near Johnson's Hall.

    Colonel WILLETT and his men left the fort and headed for the enemy's encampment near Johnson's Hall. On reaching the enemy's encampment, Colonel WILLETT and his men charged the enemy and a battle was soon raging.

    The battle ended with the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating. Lodowick with some others returned to Fort Paris where they were stationed.

    Lodowick also served as a private in Captain Severinus COOK's Company in Colonel KLOCK's Regiment at different times during 1779.

  

The above is from pages 16-19 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution, and typed by  volunteer,  Judy Anger, who comes from Herkimer/Montgomery County GenWeb .  A copy of this book can found at the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives in Fonda, New York.  Judy has found two Mohawk Valley ancestors who served in the Revolution: John HULSER b. abt. 1760 Germany, was 14-15 years old and joined Tryon County Militia Rangers.  Also, Frederick WELLER, b. 12-5-1757, Walkill, NY. Grandfather Johann Hieronimus Weller and familywere part of the Palatine Movement. Served as Sergeant in Capt. Abraham Oothout Regiment, 2nd Albany County Militia.  Other surnames from the area she is researching:  WELLER, WOODHULL, WILLSE, ORENDORF, HULSER, BASTIAN, VOORHEES, and BUNN.

 

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Last updated Tuesday, 13-May-2008 13:36:15 PDT