"A HISTORY OF FULTON COUNTY IN THE REVOLUTION"

By James F. Morrison


THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR STORY

JOHN PUTMAN: SERVES AS SERGEANT

In the spring of 1778, John enlisted while living at Broadalbin (then called Fonda's Bush) as a sergeant in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

On June 2nd, Lieutenant John Ross with about 300 Indians and Loyalists raided Mayfield, Fish House, Philadelphia Bush and Broadalbin. On raiding Broadalbin, Joseph Scott, John Reece, Herman Salisbury, Andrew Bowman and John were taken prisoners at their homes. These prisoners with the other prisoners that were taken at the other settlements were taken to Canada.

It is not known what happened to john but it is assumed that he died in a prison in Canada.

LODOWICK PUTMAN: KILLED IN 1780

Lodowick served as a private in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) while living in the Town of Johnstown. It is not known when Lodowick enlisted but he was serving in 1780 and it is not known what company he served in.

Late in the evening of May 21, 1780. Colonel Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists arrived at the northeastern part of Johnstown where they waited to attack the village. Shortly after midnight, now May 22nd, a party of the enemy broke into the Putman house and killed and scalped Lodowick and his son Aaron.

Mrs. Putman and a daughter named Hannah were not harmed and after the enemy plundered the house they left on their way to burn and kill. Now Mrs. Putman with her daughter headed for Johnstown and on arriving at Fort Johnstown she informed Captain Walter Vrooman who was in command of the fort what had happened.

On May 23rd, the two slain Putman's were buried in one coffin on their farm standing at the present day Hales Mill and Route 29 junction in the Town of Johnstown.

RICHARD PUTMAN: FOUGHT AT ORISKANY

Richard enlisted in the summer of 1775 as a private while living at Johnstown in Captain John James Davis' Company (Second Company) in Colonel Fredrick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

Richard was stationed at Caughnawaga under Captain Davis for about a week.

In the middle of January of 1776, Richard under Colonel Visscher, Captain Davis and Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer with the Tryon County Militia marched to Caughnawaga, where General Philip Schuyler and his army were encamped. General Schuyler was corresponding from there with Sir John Johnson at Johnson's Hall to persuade him to remain neutral to the Continental Congress. After a few days, on not being able to come to an agreement with Johnson, General Schuyler with the Albany County and the Tryon County Militia marched to the Village of Johnstown. Johnson and his retainers were forced to surrender all military arms and stores.

Richard under Captain Davis marched to Ballston where they were stationed.

In the spring of 1777, Richard again enlisted in Captain Davis' Company.

In the middle of July, Richard under Colonel Ebenezer Cox and General Herkimer marched to Unadilla to hold a conference with Joseph Brant and his warriors. After two weeks of holding conferences, Richard under General Herkimer returned home.

On August 3rd, the garrison at Fort Schuyler were completely besieged by the troops of Lieutenant- Colonel Barry St. Leger. General Herkimer ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton. Richard under Captain Davis and Colonel Visscher joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton.

On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to Fort Schuyler.

On August 6th, in a ravine near Oriskany Creek the relief column was ambushed. The battle lasted until a sortie was made from the fort under Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus Willett into the enemy's encampments near the fort.

The enemy at Oriskany on hearing musket and cannon fire in their rear at their encampments retreated from Oriskany to investigate the cause of the commotion at their encampments. The militia started to gather the dead and some of the wounded. Captain Davis rose from his cover when there was the crack of musket and Captain Davis fell to the ground never rising again. Richard who was near his Captain saw the concealed Indian and he fired at him and on seeing the Indian slump to the ground, Richard ran to where the Indian fell to make sure that he was dead.

The remnants of the relief column marched back to the Oneida Indian Village at Oriskany where they spent the night. In the morning of August 7th, the relief column headed back for Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. They reached those forts on August 9th.

First Lieutenant Abraham Veeder was appointed Captain in place of Captain Davis and Richard was appointed Ensign in the same company about the middle of August.

In the first part of September, Richard under Captain Veeder marched to Saratoga where they joined the encamped American Army there under General Horatio Gates and General Benedict Arnold. Richard fought at both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and October 7th.

In the summer of 1778, Richard under Captain Veeder marched to Saratoga where they were stationed for ten days.

In the fall, Richard was stationed at Fort Plank and at Fort Plain for three weeks at each fort. Richard was also stationed at Bowman's Creek, and at Stone Arabia.

In the summer and fall of 1779, Richard was stationed at Fort Plain, Fort Plank, Sacondaga Blockhouse, Bowman's Creek and at Stone Arabia.

On May 22, 1780, Colonel Sir John Johnson with 500 Indians and Loyalists were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Johnson and his men raided Tribes Hill, Fonda, Town of Mohawk and marched to Johnson's Hall at Johnstown. Johnson later that day left Johnstown and headed back to Canada. Richard's father Lodowick, his brother Aaron and his brother-in-law Amasa Stephens were killed in this raid. Richard at this time was stationed at the Sacondaga Blockhouse.

On March 8, 1781, Richard received his commission as Ensign in Captain Veeder's Company.

Richard was stationed at the Sacondaga Blockhouse and at other forts along the Mohawk River.

Sometime in 1782, Richard was appointed Lieutenant in Captain Veeder's Company.

Richard was born in 1746 and he died April 14, 1833. Richard married Nelly VanBrocklin on October 17, 1767 by the Reverend Abraham Rosencrantz. Nelly died on February 20, 1842. They are buried in the Keck Center Cemetery.

CAPTAIN NICHOLAS RECHTOR: WOUNDED IN 1779

Nicholas while living in Tilleborough (Ephratah) was appointed Captain of the Sixth Company in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment) on August 26, 1775.

In January of 1776, Captain Rechtor with his company under Colonel Klock and Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer with the whole Brigade of the Tryon County Militia marched to Caughnawaga where they joined General Philip Schuyler and his army already encamped there. After a few days of corresponding with Sir John Johnson at Johnson Hall in Johnstown and on not coming to terms with Johnson, General Schuyler with the Albany and Tryon County militia marched to Johnstown where Johnson and his retainers were forced to surrender all military stores and sign a pardon.

During the remainder of the year Captain Rechtor with his company were stationed at various forts along the Mohawk River.

In 1777, Captain Rechtor with his company were stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

On August 3rd, the garrison at Fort Schuyler were completely surrounded and besieged by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. General Herkimer ordered the Tryon County Militia to gather at Fort Dayton and from there they would march to the relief of Fort Schuyler. Captain Rechtor with his company and under Colonel Klock marched to Fort Dayton where they joined the gathering militia. On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to the relief of Fort Schuyler.

On August 6th, in a ravine near Oriskany Creek the relief column was ambushed. After several hours of fierce fighting the enemy retreated from the battlefield to investigate musket and cannon fire in their rear at their encampments near the fort. The remnants of the relief column gathered the wounded and some of the dead and marched to the Oneida Indian Village at Oriskany where they spent the night.

In the morning of August 7th, Captain Rechtor with the remnants of the relief column left the Indian Village of their return march to Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. The relief column arrived at those forts on August 9th.

In the first part of September, Captain Rechtor with a detachment from Colonel Klock's Regiment marched to Saratoga (now Stillwater) where they fought in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and October 7th. Captain Rechtor with his detachment returned home after General John Burgoyne and his army surrendered on October 17th.

In the spring of 1778, Captain Rechtor with his company were stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

During the summer Captain Rechtor with his company were stationed at Fort Schuyler for about a month when they returned home. They then were stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

On April 20, 1779, a party of nine Indians entered the Tilleborough settlement. Captain Rechtor and his company were performing military drill at the time the enemy appeared in the settlement.

The Indians now headed for the house of Henry Hart. A daughter of Hart on seeing the Indians approaching stole away to the place where Captain Rechtor and his men were assembled. While the Hart girl was gone from her father's house it was attacked by the Indians and her father was killed and the house was set on fire. The Indians now proceeded to Jacob Apply's house.

All the men except Jacob Apply, Peter Shite and two other men left the mustering area and ran for their homes to protect their families. Captain Rechtor with the three men immediately headed for the Rechtor home. The Indians burned the Jacob Apply house and they proceeded to Captain Rechtor's house.

On reaching the Rechtor house they found Henry, Rechtor's youngest son playing and the Indians killed him and scalped him. The Indians now proceeded to the house and took Mrs. Rechtor prisoner. Just then Captain Rechtor with his men arrived and fired at the Indians. One of the musket balls accidentally hit Mrs. Rechtor in the leg and the Indians now returned the fire. Captain Rechtor was hit in the arm, Peter Shite was wounded in the elbow and Jacob Apply was killed.

The Indians retreated into the woods thinking that they were outnumbered but one of their party was still in the house. Rechtor with his two men on reaching the house found the Indian but he rushed them and broke through them and escaped but he was severely wounded. Captain Rechtor with his wife and the militiamen went to Fort Paris where their wounds were cared for.

Captain Rechtor's other children reached the fort also in safety after hiding in the woods when they heard the musket fire. Captain Rechtor with his family after he and his wife had healed of their wounds moved to Albany.

Captain Rechtor received a pension from the State of New York. His pension started on September 15, 1786 and he received $240.00 per year.

Captain Rechtor died November 25, 1820.

CAPTAIN NICHOLAS RECHTOR'S COMPANY

Company Officers

Captain Nicholas Rechtor
First Lieutenant John Scholl
First Lieutenant John Williams
Second Lieutenant Han Yost Scholl
Second Lieutenant George Smith
Ensign George Fey

Sergeants

Dusler, William Smith, William
Smith, Baltus Snell, Nicholas 
Smith, George  

Corporals

Kretzer, Leonard
Kring, Lodowick
Shite, Peter

Privates

Apply, Jacob Heiney, George
Cool, Philip Kilts, Conrad
Failing, Jacob Miller, Philip
Flanders, Dennis Augustus Miller, Samuel
Flanders, Henry Smith, Henry
Flanders, John Smith, Nicholas Jr.
Frey, Jacob Smith, Nicholas Sr.
Hart, Conrad Sponable, John
Hart, Daniel Walradt, Peter
Heiney, Frederick Zimmerman, William

  

WILLIAM SCARBOROUGH: KILLED AT JOHNSTOWN

In the spring of 1778, William while living at Johnstown enlisted as a private in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). William was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In 1779 and 1780, William again served in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In April of 1781, William enlisted in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies for nine months. William was again stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer on learning of this invasion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank. Colonel Willett gathered what troops that could be spared from the fort and in the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett with his men left the fort in pursuit of the enemy.

Colonel Willett and his men pursued the enemy to Johnstown and on arriving at Fort Johnstown they were informed that the enemy had encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. On arriving on the field where the enemy was encamped a battle soon raged.

William, with James Crosset, upon learning the enemy was encamped near Johnson's Hall went to Fort Johnstown to join Colonel Willett in the pursuit of the enemy. On arriving at the fort they learned that Colonel Willett has proceeded on to Johnson's Hall and they left for the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall to join Willett.

On the way to Johnson's Hall, William and Crosset were attacked by a party of the enemy. After firing several shots Crosset was killed and Scarborough was taken prisoner. After Scarborough was captured a Captain McDonald arrived and he immediately recognized Scarborough.

At the beginning of the trouble Scarborough, a Patriot and McDonald, a Loyalist, had an argument over politics and a fight resulted. As a result of the fight McDonald was severely beaten and now having Scarborough as a prisoner he had a chance for revenge.

McDonald ordered the soldiers to shoot Scarborough but they refused to kill an unarmed man. McDonald now became enraged and he drew his sword and killed the helpless Scarborough.

The battle lasted until the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating, Scarborough, with the bodies of the rest of the Americans that were killed in the battle were gathered and it is assumed that a mass burial was performed.

JOHAN JOST SCHOLL: GUARDS WAGONS

In the summer of 1775, Johan enlisted while living at Ephratah as a corporal in Captain Nicholas Rechtor's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment).

In the spring of 1776, Johan enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company and he was appointed sergeant in that company. Johan was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

In the spring of 1777, Johan was appointed Ensign in Captain Rechtor's Company.

On August 3rd, the garrison at Fort Schuyler was completely surrounded and besieged by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton and from there they would march to the relief of Fort Schuyler. Johan under Captain Rechtor and Colonel Klock joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton.

On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to the relief of Fort Schuyler. Johan was with the baggage wagons in the rear of the column. On August 6th, the relief column was ambushed in a ravine near Oriskany Creek.

The battle lasted until a sortie from the fort under Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus Willett with 250 men into the enemy's encampments near the fort. The enemy at Oriskany on hearing cannon and musket fire in their rear at their encampments, left Oriskany to return to their encampments to investigate the cause of the commotion there.

The remnants of the relief column now gathered the wounded and some of the dead and returned to the Oneida Indian Village at Oriskany where they spent the night. In the morning of August 7th, the remnants of the relief column left the Indian Village and headed for Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. They reached those forts on August 9th.

In the spring of 1778, Johan was appointed Second Lieutenant in Captain Rechtor's Company and he was commissioned as Second Lieutenant on June 25th. Johan was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

On November 9th, Johan, under Colonel Klock, left Palatine and crossed the Mohawk River and marched for Cherry Valley where they were supposed to reinforce the garrison at Fort Alden. On November 12th, Colonel Klock and his men arrived at Cherry Valley but they found the settlement destroyed. Johan with the rest of the men gathered the slain inhabitants and performed the mass burial. After about a week Johan returned home.

In April of 1779, Johan again enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company. On April 20th, a party of nine Indians attacked Ephratah. Captain Rechtor and his wife were wounded and his youngest son Henry was killed. Captain Rechtor with his family moved to Albany for better protection.

In May, Johan enlisted as a Second Lieutenant in Captain John Hess' Company in Colonel Klock's Regiment.

Johan served under Captain Hess during the remainder of the war and he was stationed at various forts along the Mohawk River.

Johan was born in Nassau Filenburgh, Province of Orange, in Germany on October 6, 1751 and he came to America in 1767. Johan married Anna Eva Getman, daughter of Christian Getman on July 8, 1788. Johan died on January 10, 1837 and Anna died on March 4, 1841. They are buried in the Indian Castle Cemetery, Herkimer County.

JOHN SCHOLL: SERVES AD LIEUTENTANT

On August 26, 1775, John, while living in Ephratah, was appointed Ensign in Captain Nicholas Rechtor's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment).

In the spring of 1776, John again enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company and he was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

In the spring of 1777, John was appointed Second Lieutenant in Captain Rechtor's Company.

In the first part of September, John under Captain Rechtor marched to Saratoga (now Stillwater) and joined the encamped American Army there under General Horatio Gates. John fought in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and October 7th. After the surrender of General John Burgoyne and his troops on October 17th, John returned home.

In the spring of 1778, John was appointed First Lieutenant in Captain Rechtor's Company and he was commissioned First Lieutenant on June 25th. John was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

In April of 1779, John again enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company. On April 20th, Tilleborough (Ephratah) was raided by a party of nine Indians. Captain Rechtor and his wife were wounded and Rechtor's youngest son killed. Shortly afterwards Captain Rechtor with his family moved to Albany.

John served as a Lieutenant in Captain Henry Miller's Company and in Captain Peter Wagner Jr.'s Company in Colonel Klock's Regiment. When John served in these companies is not known, but it was after Captain Rechtor moved to Albany and the company was disbanded. John served until the end of the war and he was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

 

The above is transcribed from pages 28-32 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution, and typed by dedicated volunteer,  Peggy Menear.  A copy of this book can found at the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives in Fonda, New York.  Peggy is researching her Chatterton line from the Mohawk Valley.  If you have any connection to or information about the Chatterton's, she would love to hear from you.

 

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Last updated Tuesday, 13-May-2008 13:36:19 PDT