"A HISTORY OF FULTON COUNTY IN THE REVOLUTION"

By James F. Morrison


THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR STORY

JOSEPH SCOTT: ESCAPES WITH JOHN SHEW

In the spring of 1778, Joseph enlisted as a private in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Third Regiment) while living at Fonda's Bush (now Broadalbin).

On June 2nd, Lieutenant John Ross with about 300 Indians and Loyalists raided Mayfield, Philadelphia Bush and Fonda's Bush. On raiding Fonda's Bush, Ross captured John Putman, John Reece, Herman Salisbury, Andrew Bowman and Joseph at their homes. Ross with his prisoners encamped for the night at Sir William Johnson's Summer House. The next day Solomon Woodworth with Godfrey, Jacob, John and Stephen Shew were captured at Fish House.

On reaching the Caughnawaga Indian Village about nine miles above Montreal, Joseph and four others were kept by the Indians while the rest were given to the British as prisoners of war.

Joseph, with the others, were taken to another Indian Village where they were kept prisoners. After a few weeks Joseph and John Shew who had been captured at the same time as Scott were given muskets to hunt for their adopted Indian families. After about a week of going on hunting excursions, Joseph and Shew decided that the next time they went hunting they would make their escapes.

The next day they again went hunting and they made their escape. After several weeks of hardships they arrived at Saratoga. After resting for a few days Joseph and Shew started on their journey to Johnstown and they arrived there after a few days.

In the fall, Joseph and Benjamin DeLine moved into Johnson's Hall where they took residence.

Joseph served as a private in Captain Little's Company in 1779 and 1780 and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On May 22, 1780, Colonel Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists burned the Mohawk River. Johnson marched to Johnson's Hall to retrieve some valuable papers that he buried in May of 1776 when he fled to Canada. Joseph and DeLine were taken prisoners by Johnson's men and they were taken to Canada. In the fall of 1782, Joseph escaped from his prison in Canada and after several weeks of extreme hardships he reached home.

GODFREY SHEW: SERVES AS SERGEANT

Godfrey served as a sergeant in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associated Exempts in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) while living at Fish House (Northampton). It is not known when he enlisted but he was serving in 1778.

On June 2, 1778, Sergeant Solomon Woodworth, while on a scout to the Fish House, found some of the homes that he passed empty and he also discovered the tracks of a large raiding party. Woodworth now headed for the home of Godfrey Shew to warn him of a possible raid on his house.

Early in the morning of June 3rd, Woodworth with Godfrey Shew and his son John left the house in order to find the enemy's whereabouts. Godfrey's two other sons Jacob and Stephen stayed behind to guard the house. After traveling some distance, the scouting party was surprised and taken prisoners by a party of Indians under Lieutenant John Ross. They were taken to the enemy's nearby encampment.

Jacob and Stephen were taken prisoners by a different party of the enemy. The Shew home was burned leaving Mrs. Shew with her small children homeless. Mrs. Shew proceeded to Johnstown and she arrived there on June 4th. Jacob and Stephen were taken to the main encampment where they joined their father and brother.

The Shew's with the rest of the prisoners were taken to the Caughnawaga Indian Village about nine miles above Montreal. John Shew with two others were kept by the Indians while the rest were given to the British troops as prisoners of war.

Godfrey with his sons Jacob and Stephen with the other prisoners were taken to Montreal and put aboard a ship there. They were taken to Quebec and then they were taken to Halifax.

On December 1st, Godfrey with his two sons with other prisoners were put on ships and taken to Boston where they would be exchanged for prisoners held by the Americans. The Shews on being set free started on their long journey home. On reaching Sudbury about twenty miles from Boston, Jacob took sick with small-pox. Jacob was left with a Patriot family to be cared for. Godfrey and Stephen continued on their journey home and they reached Johnstown on January 1, 1779, New Year's Day. Jacob arrived at Johnstown on March 17, 1779, St. Patrick's Day.

It is not known how long Godfrey served under Captain Fonda after he returned home but it is assumed that he served until the end of the war.

Godfrey served in the French and Indian War under Sir William Johnson. Godfrey was wounded in the right arm on July 8, 1758 in the attack on Fort Ticonderoga under General James Abercrombie.

Godfrey married Katie Frey at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Shortly afterwards they moved to Johnstown, New York and a few years later they settled at the Fish House. Godfrey died in 1805 and his wife Katie died in 1804.

HENRY SHEW: HELPS CAPTURE A TORY

On March 1, 1776, Henry enlisted as a private while living at Fish House (Northampton) in Captain John Clute's Company of Boatmen for ten months. Henry was stationed at Fort Miller and Fort Owen. He was discharged on January 1, 1777.

On March 1, 1777, Henry again enlisted in Captain Clute's Company for ten months. Henry was stationed at Fort Miller and Fort Owen until the American army retreated before the army of General John Burgoyne. Henry with the rest of the company were stationed at Stillwater with the rest of the army.

Henry was engaged in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19, 1777 and on October 7, 1777. Henry also witnessed the surrendering of General Burgoyne on October 17, 1777. Henry with the rest of the company were employed in transporting the captured British provisions and ammunition to American forts along the Hudson River. Henry was discharged on January 1, 1778.

In the spring of 1778, Henry enlisted as a sergeant in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). Henry was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On June 3rd, while Henry was stationed at Fort Johnstown, a raiding party under Lieutenant John Ross burned his father's home and his father, Godfrey and his brothers, Jacob, John and Stephen were taken prisoners.

In the spring of 1779, Henry again enlisted in Captain Little's Company. Henry was stationed at Fort Johnstown and at the Sacondaga Blockhouse.

During the summer Lieutenant Benjamin DeLine, Sergeant Solomon Woodworth and Henry had learned that a Tory by the name of John Helmer had been hiding in the Village of Johnstown and decided to take Helmer prisoner. One night while Helmer was passing through Fonda's Bush on his way to his hiding place the three Patriots took him prisoner and put him in the Johnstown Jail at Fort Johnstown.

In April of 1780, Henry enlisted as a sergeant in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel John Harper's Regiment of New York State Levies. Henry was stationed at Fort Herkimer, Fort House, Fort Johnstown, Fort Paris, Fort Plank and Fort Rensselaer. Henry was discharged at Fort Herkimer on January 1, 1781.

In the spring of 1781, Henry enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Bush with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, on learning of the invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what men that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left Fort Rensselaer in pursuit of Ross. Captain Little at Fort Johnstown, on being informed of this invasion, gathered a small scouting party to search for signs of the enemy. Captain Little, Lieutenant Zepheniah Batcheller, Sergeant John Eikler, Henry, Corporal Jacob Shew, Privates John Brothers, Peter Yost Jr., David and John Moyer with four others left Fort Johnstown in search of the enemy.

Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major Ross and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen Shew, then on sentry duty, fired at them and the garrison turned out to defend the fort. After a few minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain Little and his scouting party. Captain Little ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and the scouting party followed the enemy.

Shortly after the garrison had reached the fort, Colonel Willett and his men arrived. The garrison informed Colonel Willett what had happened and that the enemy had encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett with his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. Just as Colonel Willett and his troops arrived on the field, Captain Little and his scouting party fell in with the rear guard of the enemy.

Captain Little was hit in the shoulder with a musket ball and the scouting party took to the woods to find cover. Here another brief exchange of musket fire took place and Sergeant Eikler was killed. The scouting party now joined Willett on the battlefield and fought until the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating.

In April of 1782, Henry enlisted in Captain Abner French's Company in Colonel Willett's Regiment as a sergeant for nine months. Henry was discharged on January 1, 1783.

JACOB SHEW: RETURNS HOME ON ST. PATRICK'S DAY

In June of 1778, Jacob enlisted as a private in Captain Samuel Rees' Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Third Regiment) while living at Fish House (Town of Northampton).

On June 2nd, Sergeant Solomon Woodworth, while on a scout to Fish House, found many of the homes he passed burned or empty and he discovered the tracks of a large raiding party. Woodworth now headed for the home of Godfrey Shew to warn him of a possible raid on his house and he arrived there about dusk.

Early in the morning of June 3rd, Woodworth with Godfrey and John Shew left the house in order to find the enemy's whereabouts. Jacob and Stephen stayed behind to guard the house. After traveling some distance, the scouting party was surprised and taken prisoners by a party of Indians under Lieutenant John Ross. They were taken to the enemy's nearby encampment.

Jacob who had been stationed on a knoll near the house that overlooked the nearby Sacondaga River, saw a canoe coming down the river and he ran back home to inform his mother about the presence of the enemy that came from another direction.

The Shew home and barn were set on fire leaving Mrs. Shew with her small children homeless. The enemy took Jacob and Stephen to the main encampment where the other prisoners were held. Mrs. Shew with her children started Johnstown and they arrived there on June 4th.

The Shews with the rest of the prisoners were taken to the Caughnawaga Indian Village about nine miles above Montreal. John Shew with two others were kept by the Indians while the rest were given to the British troops as prisoners of war.

Jacob with his father Godfrey and his brother Stephen with the other prisoners were taken to Montreal and put aboard a ship there. They were taken to Quebec and then they were taken to Halifax.

On December 1st, Jacob with his father and brother with other prisoners were put on ships and taken to Boston where they would be exchanged for prisoners held by the Americans. The Shews on being set free started on their long journey home. On reaching Sudbury about twenty miles from Boston, Jacob took sick with small-pox. Jacob was left with a Patriot family to be cared for. Godfrey and Stephen continued on their journey home and they reached Johnstown on January 1, 1779, New Year's Day. Jacob arrived at Johnstown cured of the small-pox on March 17, 1779, it being St. Patrick's Day.

In April, Jacob enlisted as a private in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. Jacob was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In the fall, Jacob served as a substitute for Michael Gollinger for four weeks in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associated Exempts in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. Jacob was stationed at Minden during this tour.

In April 1780, Jacob enlisted as a private in Captain garret Putman's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies. Jacob was stationed at Fort Rensselaer and Fort Johnstown and he was discharged on January 12, 1781.

In April of 1781, Jacob enlisted as a corporal in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies. Jacob was stationed at Fort Hunter, Fort Rensselaer and then at Fort Johnstown.

Jacob, under Captain Putman, was ordered twice to guard supply boats up the Mohawk River to Fort Schuyler. On the second tour of guarding the supply boats, they were attacked by a small party of Indians and Loyalists. After a few shots were fired, the enemy fled taking several wounded with them and leaving one behind dead. Only one of Putman's men was wounded.

In July, Jacob enlisted as a private in Captain Solomon Woodworth's Company in Colonel Willett's Regiment. On September 6th, Jacob under Captain Woodworth left Fort Rensselaer and marched to Fort Dayton where they spent the night.

In the morning of September 7th, Jacob under Captain Woodworth, went out on a scout along the West Canada Creek. After marching about ten miles the scouting party fell into an ambush by a party of Indians and Loyalists under Lieutenant Jacob Clement. After about ten minutes of fighting Captain Woodworth with twenty-four men of his company were killed and seven others were taken prisoners. Jacob with a few others escaped back to Fort Dayton.

On September 8th, Jacob with Captain Putman and his company returned to the site of the ambush and buried Woodworth and his men. Jacob re-enlisted in Captain Putman's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer on learning of this invasion sent messengers to Fort Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what men that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left the fort in pursuit of the enemy. Captain Little at Fort Johnstown on being informed of this invasion organized a scouting party to search for signs of the enemy. Captain Little, Lieutenant Zepheniah Batcheller, Sergeant John Eikler, Sergeant Henry Shew, Jacob, Privates John Brothers, Peter Yost Jr., David and John Moyer with four others left the fort in search of the enemy.

Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major Ross and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen Shew, then on sentry duty, fired at them and the men in the fort turned out to defend the fort. After a few minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain Little and his scouting party. Captain Little ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and the scouting party would follow the enemy.

Shortly after the garrison arrived at the fort, Colonel Willett and his men arrived. The garrison informed Colonel Willett what had happened and that the enemy had encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. Just as Colonel Willett and his troops arrived on the field, Captain Little and his scouting party fell in with rear guard of the enemy.

Captain Little was hit in the shoulder with a musket ball and the scouting party took to the woods to find cover. Here another brief exchange of musket fire took place and Sergeant Eikler was killed. The scouting party now joined Willett on the battlefield. The battle raged until the coming of darkness and the enemy retreating. Jacob returned to Fort Johnstown where he was stationed. Jacob was discharged on January 1, 1782.

In April of 1782, Jacob enlisted as a corporal in Captain Abner French's Company in Colonel Willett's Regiment. Jacob was discharged on January 1, 1783.

In April of 1783, Jacob enlisted as a corporal in Captain Peter B. Tearce's Company of Light Infantry in Colonel Willett's Regiment. In July Jacob enlisted as a private in Captain Lloyd's Company in Colonel Moses Mazen's Regiment. Jacob was discharged on January 1, 1784.

Jacob was born on April 16, 1763 at Johnstown and he died January 23, 1856. Jacob married Hannah Putman the daughter of Lodowick Putman who was killed with his son Aaron on May 22, 1780. They were married on March 10, 1787. Hannah was born December 9, 1764 and she died on October 5, 1847. They are buried in the Evan Mills Cemetery, Town of LeRoy, Jefferson County.

JOHN SHEW: KILLED NEAR BALLSTON

John with the others were taken to another Indian Village where they were kept prisoners. After a few weeks John and Joseph Scott, one of the prisoners kept by the Indians, were given muskets to hunt for their adopted Indian families. After about a week of going on hunting excursions, John and Scott decided that the next time they went hunting they would make their escape.

The next day they again went hunting and they made their escape. After several weeks of hardships they arrived at Saratoga. After resting for a few days John and Scott started on their journey to Johnstown and they arrived there after a few days.

In the spring of 1779, John enlisted as a private in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. John was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In the spring of 1780, John again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On October 16th, John left Johnstown to go hunting with his friend Isaac Palmatier who lived at Ballston and he arrived there about nightfall. Early in the morning of October 17th, John with Isaac went to a chestnut grove to look for any signs of deer. On reaching the grove, the two men were surprised by a party of seven Indians and they were taken prisoners. The prisoners were taken to a larger encampment nearby. About 200 Indians and Loyalists under a Major Munroe had attacked the Ballston settlement and had returned with several prisoners. Soon after reaching the encampment, two Indians grabbed John and took him into the nearby woods and killed him. Palmatier* with the rest of the prisoners were taken to Canada.

John enlisted in June of 1778 while living at Fish House as a private in Captain Samuel Rees' Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

On June 2nd, Sergeant Solomon Woodworth, while on a scout to the Fish House, found some of the homes that he passed empty and he also discovered the tracks of a large raiding party. Woodworth now headed for the home of Godfrey Shew to warn him of a possible raid on his house.

Early in the morning of June 3rd, Woodworth with Godfrey and John left the house in order to find the enemy's whereabouts. Jacob and Stephen stayed behind to guard the house. After traveling some distance, the scouting party was surprised and taken prisoners by a party of Indians under Lieutenant John Ross of the 34th Regiment. They were taken to the enemy's encampment.

Jacob who had been stationed on a knoll near the house that overlooked the nearby Sacondaga River saw a canoe coming down the river and he ran back home to inform his mother of the presence of the enemy. On reaching the house, Jacob was taken prisoner with his brother Stephen by another party of the enemy that came from another direction.

The Shew home and barn were set on fire leaving Mrs. Shew with her smaller children homeless. The enemy took Jacob and Stephen back to their encampment. Mrs. Shew with her children started for Johnstown and they reached there on June 4th.

The Shews with the rest of the prisoners were taken to the Caughnawaga Indian Village about nine miles above Montreal. John Shew with two others were kept by the Indians while the rest were given to the British troops as prisoners of war.

* Isaac Palmatier was serving as a private in Captain Tyrannus Collin's Company (Fifth Company) in Colonel Jacob VanSchoonhoven's Regiment of Albany County Militia (Twelfth Regiment) and he was released on December 6, 1782. STEPHEN SHEW: ENLISTS IN 1778

In June of 1778, Stephen while living at Fish House enlists as a private in Captain Samuel Rees' Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

On June 2nd, Sergeant Solomon Woodworth, while on a scout to the Fish House, found some of the homes that he passed empty and he also discovered the tracks of a large raiding party. Woodworth now headed for the home of Godfrey Shew to warn him of a possible raid on his house.

Early in the morning of June 3rd, Woodworth with Godfrey and John left the house in order to find the enemy's whereabouts. Jacob and Stephen stayed behind to guard the house. After traveling some distance, the scouting party was surprised and taken prisoners by a party of Indians under Lieutenant John Ross of the 34th Regiment. They were taken to the enemy's nearby encampment.

Jacob who had been stationed on a knoll near the house that overlooked the nearby Sacondaga River saw a canoe coming down the river and he ran back home to inform his mother of the presence of the enemy. On reaching the house, Jacob was taken prisoner with his brother Stephen by another party of the enemy that came from another direction.

The Shew home and barn were set on fire leaving Mrs. Shew and her smaller children homeless. The enemy took Stephen and Jacob back to their encampment. Mrs. Shew with her children started for Johnstown and they reached there on June 4th.

The Shews with the rest of the prisoners were taken to the Caughnawaga Indian Village about nine miles above Montreal. John Shew with two others were kept by the Indians while the rest were given to the British troops as prisoners of war.

Stephen with his father Godfrey and his brother Jacob with the other prisoners were taken to Montreal and put aboard a ship there. They were then taken to Quebec and then they were taken to Halifax.

On December 1st, Stephen with his father and brother with the other prisoners were put on ships and taken to Boston where they would be exchanged for prisoners held by the Americans. The Shews on being set at liberty started on their long journey home. On reaching Sudbury about twenty miles from Boston, Jacob took sick with small-pox. Jacob was left with a Patriot family to be cared for. Godfrey and Stephen continued their journey home and they reached Johnstown on January 1, 1779. On March 17, 1779, Jacob arrived at Johnstown, cured of the small-pox.

In the spring of 1779, Stephen enlisted in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. Stephen was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In the spring of 1780, Stephen again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In the first part of October, John Cook Jr. with about twelve men from the King's Royal Regiment of New Yorkers fired upon the sentry at Fort Johnstown. The sentry returned the fire and hit Cook in the knee. A few days later Sergeant Selah Woodworth and Stephen and several others on learning that they were hiding in the woods near Cook's father's house went there to take them prisoner. Cook with a few others were taken prisoners and were taken back to Fort Johnstown and from there to Albany.

On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command of Fort Rensselaer, on learning of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what men that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left Fort Rensselaer in pursuit of the enemy. Captain Little at Fort Johnstown on learning of this invasion, gathered a scout of twelve men to search for the enemy.

Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major Ross and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen, then on sentry duty, fired at them and the men in the fort turned out to defend the fort. After a new minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison including Stephen pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain Little and his scouting party. Captain Little ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and the scouting party would follow the enemy.

Shortly after the garrison had returned to the fort, Colonel Willett and his men arrived. The garrison informed Colonel Willett what had happened and that the enemy had encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall.

On Colonel Willett and his men arriving at Johnson's Hall, a battle soon raged. The battle ended with darkness falling on the battlefield and with the enemy retreating.

In the morning of October 26th, Stephen with several others went on a scout and captured two British Regulars that had gotten lost and took them back to Fort Johnstown.

On October 30th, Colonel Willett skirmished with the rear guard of the enemy under Captain Butler at West Canada Creek and Captain Butler with several others were killed.

In the spring of 1782, Stephen enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

Stephen served at various times under Captain Jellis Fonda in his Company of Exempts in Colonel Visscher's Regiment.

Stephen was born in 1762 and he died on March 27, 1841. Stephen married Rachel Sammons but there is no further information on her. Stephen married for a second time in 1806. He married Susannah Wells in the Town of Providence, Saratoga County by the Reverend Jonathan Finch of the Baptist Church. Susannah was born in 1778 she died on January 13, 1858. They are buried in the Evans Mills Cemetery, Town of LeRoy, Jefferson County.

PETER SHITE: WOUNDED IN THE ELBOW

On March 1, 1777, Peter enlisted as a private in Captain Nicholas Rechtor's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment) while living at Ephratah.

On April 1st, Peter enlisted in Captain John Breadbake's Company (Fifth Company) in Colonel Klock's Regiment. Peter was on scouts to Palatine and Herkimer at various times. Peter was discharged on July 1st.

On July 2nd, Peter re-enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company. In the middle of July, Peter under Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer marched to Unadilla to hold a conference with Joseph Brant and his warriors. After about two weeks General Herkimer with his detachment returned home.

On August 3rd, the garrison at Fort Schuyler was completely besieged and surrounded by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. General Herkimer ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton and they would go to the relief of Fort Schuyler from there. Peter under Captain Rechtor and Colonel Klock joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton.

On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to the relief of Fort Schuyler. In the morning of August 6th, the relief column was ambushed in a ravine near Oriskany Creek. The battle raged until a sortie was made from Fort Schuyler under Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus Willett into the enemy's encampments near the fort. The enemy at Oriskany, on hearing musket and cannon fire in their rear retreated back to their encampments to investigate the cause of the musket and cannon fire.

The remnants of the relief column started to gather the wounded and some of the dead. The militiamen marched back to the Oneida Indian Village at Oriskany where they spent the night. In the morning of August 7th, the relief column started on their return march to Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. They reached those forts on August 9th.

In April of 1778, Peter enlisted as a corporal in Captain Rechtor's Company. Peter was stationed at Fort Plank for a few weeks.

In July Peter was stationed at Fort Zimmerman for seven days and in August he was stationed for two days at the home of one Dusler.

On November 9th, Peter under Colonel Klock marched to Cherry Valley to reinforce the garrison at Fort Alden. When the detachment arrived on November 12th, they found the Cherry Valley settlement in ashes and many of the inhabitants were found dead. The militiamen put out the remaining fires and buried the dead. Peter with the rest of the detachment returned home after about a week.

In April of 1779, Peter again enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company. On April 20th, a party of nine Indians entered the Tilleborough (Ephratah) settlement. Captain Rechtor with his company were performing military drill at the time the enemy entered the settlement.

The Indians now headed for the home of Henry Hart. A daughter of Hart, on seeing the Indians approaching, stole away to the place where Captain Rechtor and his men were assembled. While the Hart girl was gone her father's home was attacked and he was killed and the Indians then set it on fire. The Indians now proceeded to Jacob Apply's house.

The Indians burned Apply's house and proceeded to Captain Rechtor's house. Captain Rechtor with Jacob Apply, Peter and two other men went with Rechtor to his house. The other militiamen ran to their homes to protect their families.

On reaching the Rechtor house they found Henry, Rechtor's youngest son playing and the Indians killed and scalped him. The Indians now proceeded to the house and took Mrs. Rechtor prisoner. Just then Captain Rechtor with his men arrived and fired at the Indians. Two of the Indians were killed and Mrs. Rechtor was accidentally wounded in the leg and the Indians returned the fire. Captain Rechtor was hit in the arm, Jacob Apply was killed and Peter was hit in the elbow by a musket ball.

The Indians retreated into the woods thinking that they were outnumbered but one of their party was still in the house. Rechtor and his men on reaching the house found the Indian but he rushed them and broke through them and escaped but he was severely wounded. Captain Rechtor with his wife and the militiamen went back to Fort Paris where their wounds were cared for.

In the morning of April 21st, Captain Peter Wagner Jr., with the party of men pursued the enemy but they were too far ahead and the militiamen brought the bodies of young Rechtor and Apply back to the fort. Peter was unable to do any military duty or any labor as a result of the wound until the following year.

In April of 1780, Peter enlisted as a private in Captain Henry Miller's Company (Third Company) in Colonel Klock's Regiment. Peter was stationed at Fort Snell for a few weeks.

In the last week of July Peter under Colonel Klock and General Robert VanRensselaer guarded Captain Samuel Gray and his boatmen with supply boats up the Mohawk River to Fort Schuyler. Peter with the detachment returned home after a week. On October 19th, Colonel Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel John Brown who was in command at Fort Paris on learning of this invasion gathered about 250 men and left the fort in search of the enemy. Colonel Brown and his men fell in with the enemy near the farm of Severinus Dygert. After about fifteen minutes of fighting, the Americans retreated leaving Colonel Brown and forty-five men behind dead.

Peter on learning of this battle crossed the Mohawk River and joined General Robert VanRensselaer and his growing army. Peter under Colonel Lewis DuBois with about 300 men crossed the Mohawk River and pursued Johnson until they reached Klock's and Failing's Flats where another battle took place. The battle lasted until darkness fell on the battlefield and with the enemy retreating. In the spring of 1781, Peter again enlisted in Captain Miller's Company.

On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Marinus Willett, who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, upon receiving word of this invasion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what troops that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett with his men marched out of Fort Rensselaer in pursuit of the enemy. Colonel Willett and his men crossed over the Mohawk River to Caughnawaga where Peter under Captain Miller with men from Fort Paris joined him.

Colonel Willett and his men proceeded to Johnstown and on reaching Fort Johnstown, Willett was informed that the enemy had encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett with his men marched out of Fort Johnstown and proceeded to Johnson's Hall.

On reaching the enemy's encampment, Willett and his men charged the enemy and now a fierce battle raged. The battle lasted until darkness fell on the battlefield and with the enemy retreating.

On April 1, 1782, Peter enlisted as a private in Captain Abner French's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies.

Peter was stationed at Fort Herkimer with the company. Peter went on a scout for two days with Peter Getman. Another time Peter went on scout with the company to Schuyler's Lake and fell in with a party of Indians, but after a few minutes of fighting the Indians retreated. Peter was discharged on January 1, 1783.

In April of 1783, Peter again enlisted in Captain Miller's Company performing garrison duties at various forts.

Peter's last name was spelled the following ways: Scheets, Shait, Shyke but Peter in his pension claim no. S11375 signed his name as Shite. 

WILLIAM SMITH: DISCHARGED AT FORT HERKIMER

In April of 1779, William enlisted while living in Ephratah as a sergeant in Captain Nicholas Rechtor's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Second Regiment).

On April 20th, Tilleborough (Ephratah) was attacked by a party of nine Indians. Captain Rechtor and his wife were wounded and Rechtor's youngest son Henry was killed. Shortly afterwards Captain Rechtor with his family moved to Albany and Rechtor's Company was disbanded.

In May, William enlisted as a private in Captain John Roof's Company in Colonel Klock's Regiment. William was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

On April 1, 1780, William enlisted as a private in Captain John Casselman's Company of Tryon County Rangers attached to Colonel Klock's Regiment. William was stationed at Fort Paris. William was discharged at Fort Paris on January 1, 1781.

In April of 1781, William enlisted as a private in Captain Thomas Skinner's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies. In August, William transferred to Captain Lawrence Gros' Company in Colonel Willett's Regiment for three months.

On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett, who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, upon receiving word of this invasion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what troops that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

In the morning of October 25th, William under Captain Gros and Colonel Willett left the fort in pursuit of the enemy. Willett pursued the enemy to Johnstown. On arriving at Fort Johnstown, he was informed by the garrison that the enemy was encamped near Johnson's Hall.

Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. On arriving there Willett charged the enemy and now a fierce battle raged. The battle lasted until darkness fell and with the enemy retreating.

William under Colonel Willett marched to Fort Dayton. On October 28th, William under Colonel Willett left Fort Dayton in pursuit again of Major Ross. During the pursuit, William became lame and returned to Fort Dayton. On October 30th, Colonel Willett and his men skirmished with the enemy at West Canada Creek where Captain Butler was killed.

In November, William substituted for one Miller in Captain Anthony Whelp's Company in Colonel Willett's Regiment for one month. In December William rejoined Captain Skinner's Company. William was discharged on January 1, 1782.

On April 1, 1782, William enlisted in Captain Abner French's Company in Colonel Willett's Regiment. William was stationed at Fort House and Fort Herkimer. William was discharged at Fort Herkimer on January 1, 1783.

William was born on May 19, 1763 and he died on May 22, 1852. William married Ursula Sponable. Ursula was born February 7, 1772 and she died on September 22, 1831. They are buried in the Tilleborough Cemetery in the Town of Ephratah.

JOHN SPONABLE: TAKEN PRISONER IN 1777

 In the spring of 1776, John enlisted while living at Ephratah as a private in Captain Nicholas Rechtor's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Jacob Klock's Regiment of Tryon County (Second Regiment).

In August, John enlisted as a private in Captain Christian Getman's Company of Tryon County Rangers. John was discharged on March 27, 1777.

In April of 1777, John again enlisted in Captain Rechtor's Company and he was stationed at different forts along the Mohawk River.

On August 3rd, the garrison at Fort Schuyler was completely surrounded and besieged by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton and that they would march to the relief of Fort Schuyler from there. John under Captain Rechtor and Colonel Klock joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton. On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to Fort Schuyler.

On August 5th, John and Jacob I. Klock who was on a horse when a little in the rear of the rear guard, when Klock's horse smelled something and Klock on assuming danger near sped off to the safety of the rear guard, leaving John alone. Suddenly a small party of Indians sprang out from behind the trees and brush and took John prisoner. It is assumed that John was taken to the Indian encampment near Fort Schuyler and held prisoner there until after the Battle of Oriskany on August 6th and then taken to Canada. John was released on September 3, 1781 and reached home a few weeks later.

John was born in 1745 and he died on September 12, 1827. He is buried in the Tilleborough Cemetery in Ephratah. John married Elizabeth Kring on February 9, 1770.

AMASA STEPHENS: SERVES AS CORPORAL

 In the spring of 1778, Amasa enlisted as a corporal in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) while living in Mayfield.

In the spring of 1779, Amasa again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

In April of 1780, Amasa again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

On May 22nd, Colonel Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Just about dawn the enemy appeared at the Stephens home. They broke the door in and immediately headed to where the Stephens were sleeping. The Indians dragged Stephens from his bed and took him outside. On reaching outside the Indians tomahawked and scalped Amasa and then hung him on the fence near the house. The enemy then plundered the house and then left without harming Mrs. Stephens or her children.

After the enemy left, Mrs. Stephens went looking for her husband and on going outside she discovered him hung on the fence. She took him down and took his body back into the house. Mrs. Stephens immediately grabbed her two children and headed for Fort Johnstown and she arrived there a few hours later. On arriving at Fort Johnstown Mrs. Stephens met her mother and learned that her father and brother were killed.

Amasa married Margaret Putman in 1776 and they had two children Lodowick and Clarissa. Mrs. Stephens died in 1835.

HENRY STONER: SERVES AS PRIVATE

On June 18, 1777, Henry enlisted as a private in Captain James Robicheaux's Company (Third Company) in Colonel James Livingston's Regiment of Continentals (First Canadian Regiment) while living in Johnstown.

Henry was stationed at Johnstown until the last week of August when Henry marched with the regiment to Saratoga (now Stillwater) and joined the encamped American Army under General Horatio Gates there.

Henry fought in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and on October 7th. Henry also witnessed the surrendering of General John Burgoyne and his troops on October 17th.

In 1778, Henry was stationed at Johnstown, Fishkill, Peekskill, Middleton and Bristol.

Henry was stationed with the regiment at Freetown and Bristol in 1779 and Henry served in this regiment until he was discharged on July 24, 1780.

In the spring of 1781, Henry enlisted as a private in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associated Exempts in Colonel Fredrick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) and he served in the same company and regiment in 1782.

In the spring of 1782, Henry with his wife moved from Johnstown to the Town of Amsterdam.

On July 1st, a party of seven Indians appeared at the Stoner home. Henry and his nephew Michael Reed were in one of the fields working when Reed discovered the Indians. Henry ran for the house to get his musket but one of the Indians intercepted Henry and killed and scalped him. Reed attempted to flee to the safety of the woods but he was taken prisoner.

The Indians went to the Stoner house which they plundered and set on fire. Mrs. Stoner was not harmed and after the Indians had left she went to a nearby neighbors house. The Indians took Reed and two other prisoners back to Canada.

JOHN STONER: THE FORGOTTEN STONER

On June 8, 1777, John enlisted as a drummer in Captain Abraham Livingston's Company (First Company) in Colonel James Livingston's Regiment of Continentals (First Canadian Regiment), while living at Johnstown.

On August 19th, John under Colonel Livingston and General Benedict Arnold left the German Flatts on their journey to the relief of Fort Schuyler that was besieged by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. On August 22nd, on receiving word of Arnold's approach, St. Leger and his troops retreated from the fort and headed back to Canada. Shortly afterwards Arnold and his troops arrived at the fort with the badly needed supplies.

In the first week of September, John under Colonel Livingston arrived at Saratoga (now Stillwater) and joined the encamped American Army under General Horatio Gates there. John fought in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and October 7th. John also witnessed the surrendering of General John Burgoyne and his troops on October 17th.

John served in this regiment until he was discharged in January of 1782.

John married Susannah Philes shortly after the war and five children were born to them.

In 1812, John enlisted as a drum major in a regiment of militia to again fight for freedom. During the enlistment John was stationed at Sackett's Harbor and shortly afterwards he took sick and died.

NICHOLAS STONER: SERVES AS FIFER 

On June 4, 1777, Nicholas enlisted as a fifer in Captain Peter VanRensselaer's Company (Fourth Company) in Colonel James Livingston's Continental Regiment (First Canadian Regiment) while living at Johnstown.

Nicholas was stationed at Johnstown for a few weeks and then he was stationed at Loudon's Ferry where he transferred to Captain Timothy Hughes' Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Livingston's Regiment as a private.

On August 19th, Nicholas under Colonel Livingston and General Benedict Arnold left the German Flatts on their journey to the relief of Fort Schuyler that was besieged by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. On August 22nd, on receiving word of Arnold's approach, St. Leger and his troops retreated from the fort and headed back to Canada. Shortly afterwards Arnold and his troops arrived at the fort with the badly needed supplies.

In the first week of September, Nicholas under Colonel Livingston arrived at Saratoga (now Stillwater) and joined the encamped American Army under General Horatio Gates there. Nicholas fought in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and October 7th. Nicholas also witnessed the surrendering of General John Burgoyne and his troops on October 17th.

In December, Nicholas was stationed at Johnstown with the rest of the regiment.

In January of 1778 until the end of March Nicholas was stationed at Johnstown. In April and May he was stationed at Fishkill. In June he was stationed at Peekskill and in July he was stationed at Middleton. In August Nicholas was stationed at Warren, Rhode Island where he fought a battle on August 25th. In September he was again stationed at Warren. In October Nicholas was appointed fifer in Captain Hughes Company and he was stationed at Bristol from October to December.

In January and February of 1779, Nicholas was again stationed at Bristol. In March to May, Nicholas was stationed at Freetown. In June, Nicholas rejoined Captain VanRensselaer's Company as a fifer and he was stationed at Freetown from June until October. In November and December he was stationed in Morristown, New Jersey.

In January, First Lieutenant Peter J. Vosburgh was promoted Captain in place of VanRensselaer who had resigned. In January and February under Captain Vosburgh, Nicholas was stationed at Morristown, New Jersey. In April and May he was stationed at Mendham. In June to October Nicholas was stationed Verplanck's Point.

In January, Nicholas enlisted as a fifer in Captain Samuel T. Pell's Company (Fourth Company) in Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt's Regiment of Continentals (Second New York) and he was stationed at Fort Herkimer until July. In August and September he was stationed at Pumton.

In October, Nicholas with the entire regiment were engaged in the Yorktown, Virginia campaign. Nicholas witnessed the surrendering of Lord Cornwallis on October 19th. In November and December he was stationed at Pumton.

Nicholas served under Captain Pell and Colonel Van Cortlandt until he was discharged on May 21, 1783 at the New Windsor Cantonment, New York.

On November 9, 1783, Nicholas enlisted as a private in Captain Peter B. Tearce's Company of Light Infantry in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies. Nicholas was discharged on December 31, 1783.

Nicholas also served as a private in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associate Exempts in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Third Regiment) but when or how long is not known.

Shortly after the end of the war, Nicholas married Anna Mason Scarborough the widow of William Scarborough who was killed in the Battle of Johnstown on October 25, 1781. After forty years of marriage Anna died.

In 1813, Nicholas enlisted as a Fife Major in Captain A.P. Spencer's Company in Colonel Melanchton Smith's Regiment. Nicholas fought in the Battle of Plattsburg in September 1814.

After Anna died, Nicholas lived with Mrs. Polly Phye until she died. Nicholas then married Hannah Frank the widow of Henry Frank. They were married on April 22, 1840 at the home of Tunis VanVleet in the Town of Johnstown by the Justice of the Peace James Hildreth.

Nicholas died on November 24, 1853 at his home in the Town of Caroga. Charles R. Bellows furnished the coffin and the hearse that conveyed the coffin from Caroga and Stoner was buried in Kingsborough Cemetery in Gloversville on November 26, 1853. Several years later, Stoner's remains were removed from the Kingsborough Cemetery and re-interred in the Prospect Hill Cemetery.

 

Please Note: Pages 33-38 are pictures, not text.

The above is transcribed from pages 39-49 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution, and typed by dedicated volunteer,  Peggy Menear.  A copy of this book can found at the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives in Fonda, New York.  Peggy is researching her Chatterton line from the Mohawk Valley.  If you have any connection to or information about the Chatterton's, she would love to hear from you.

 

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