"A HISTORY OF FULTON COUNTY IN THE REVOLUTION"

By James F. Morrison


THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR STORY

DAVID VAN SICKLER: DISCHARGED AT THE GERMAN FLATTS

David enlisted on April 27, 1781, while living at Johnstown as a private in Captain Garret PUTMAN's Company in Colonel Mairnus WILLETT's Regiment of New York State Levies for nine months.

David was stationed at Fort Rensselaer and other forts along the Mohawk River.

On October 24th, Major John ROSS and Captain Walter BUTLER were in the Mohawk Valley with 607 Indians and Loyalists burning and killing. Colonel WILLETT at Fort Rensselaer, on receiving word of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops and gathered what troops that could be spared from Fort Rensselaer and in the morning of October 25th he went in pursuit. David under Captain PUTMAN and with most of the company then stationed at Fort Rensselaer joined Colonel WILLETT in pursuit of the enemy.

Colonel WILLETT and his men pursued the enemy to the Village Of Johnstown. On arriving at Fort Johnstown in Johnstown, Colonel WILLETT was informed by the garrison that the enemy were encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel WILLETT with his men left the fort and marched for the enemy encampment. On reaching the enemy's encampment, Colonel WILLETT and his men charged the enemy and now a fierce battle was raging.

The battle ended with the coming of darkness and with Major ROSS and his men retreating. David under Colonel WILLETT returned to Fort Rensselaer and from there marched to Fort Dayton.

On October 28th, Colonel WILLETT with fresh troops left Fort Dayton again in pursuit of the enemy. David was one of over 400 men who were determined to drive the enemy out of the Mohawk Valley forever.

On October 30th, Colonel WILLETT and his men skirmished with the rear guard of the enemy at the West Canada Creek. After several minutes of fighting the enemy retreated leaving their fallen comrades behind. Captain Walter BUTLER was found barely alive but an Oneida Indiana named Anthony tomahawked and scalped BUTLER. Eight more Butler's Rangers were found dead. Colonel WILLETT and his men returned to Fort Rensselaer.

David was discharged on January 1, 1782 at the German Flatts.

David enlisted in April of 1782 to Captain Abner FRENCH's Company in Colonel WILLETT's Regiment. In November David transferred to Captain Jellis A. FONDA's Company of Colonel WILLETT's Regiment. David was discharged at the German Flatts on January 1, 1783.

David was born on September 29, 1764 and he died at Johnstown on June 29, 1828. David was married to Mary ............ in March of 1791 by the Johnstown Justice of the Peace, John LITTLE. Mary died February 2, 1851.

WILLIAM WALLACE: SERVES AT SARATOGA

In January of 1776, William enlisted as a private in Captain John VISSCHER's Company (Fourth Company) in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) while living in Johnstown.

Shortly afterwards, William with Frederick SAMMONS and several other militiamen were stationed at the home of Captain Andrew WEMPLE for three days.

In September, William with Frederick SAMMONS under Major John BLIVEN with a detachment of militiamen left Caughnawaga in pursuit of Loyalists heading for Canada. Major BLIVEN and his men caught up with the Loyalists one days march north of Ballston. The Loyalists had killed an ox and were putting the butchered meat in their knapsacks in preparation to continue their journey to Canada. The Loyalists were surprised by BLIVEN and his men and sixty-six of the Loyalists were captured without firing a shot. Fourteen of the Loyalists escaped and WALLACE with SAMMONDS with ten other men went in pursuit of them. After chasing them for two days the militiamen overtook the Loyalists and captured five of them and dispersed the rest. Major BLIVEN and his detachment took the seventy-one Loyalists to Fort Johnstown and put them in the jail at the fort.

In January of 1777, William enlisted in Captain Samuel PETTINGELL's Company (Fifth Company) in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment. About the first week of January William under Colonel Ebenezer COX with a detachment of Tryon County Militia marched to Fort Ticonderoga where they were stationed until April when they returned home and were discharged.

On May 6th, William enlisted as First Lieutenant in Captain Derick HANSON"s Company (Second Company) in Colonel James LIVINGSTON's Continental Regiment (First Canadian Regiment).

In August, William under Colonel LIVINGSTON marched to Saratoga (now Stillwater) and joined the encamped American Army under General Horatio GATES there. William fought in both Battles of Saratoga on September 19th and on October 7th. William also witnessed the surrendering of General John BURGOYNE and his troops on October 17th.

In December William was stationed at Johnstown with the rest of the regiment.

In January of 1778, William was stationed at Johnstown until the end of March. In April and May William was stationed at Fishkill. In June he was stationed at Peekskill and in July he was stationed in Middleton. In August to September he was stationed at Warren. In October to December he was stationed at Bristol.

In January of 1779 to February, William was stationed at Bristol and from March to August he was stationed at Freetown. On August 19th, William resigned his commission as First Lieutenant in Colonel LIVINGSTON's Regiment and he went home to take care of his father's family.

In May of 1780, William enlisted as a sergeant in Captain Jellis FONDA's Company of Associated Exempts in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment.

In the middle of May, William with Thomas SAMMONS and a few other militiamen went out on a scout and returned after scouting for nine days.

On May 22nd, Colonel Sir John JOHNSON with 500 Indians and Loyalists raided Tribes Hill, Fonda and Johnstown. William was stationed at one of the forts at this time but his house was set on fire and it burned to the ground.

In July William enlisted as a Lieutenant in Captain Hans Marcus DEMUTH's Company in Colonel Lewis DUBOIS' Regiment of New York State Levies.

On October 19th, Colonel Sir John JOHNSON with about 500 Indians and Loyalists were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel John BROWN, who was in command at Fort Paris, marched out of the fort with about 250 men and engaged JOHNSON in a battle at Stone Arabia. Colonel BROWN with about forty-five of his men were killed. Some of BROWN's men escaped by crossing the Mohawk River and immediately joined General Robert VAN RENSSELAER's growing army. General VAN RENSSELAER on being informed of what happened at Stone Arabia ordered Colonel DUBOIS to pursue and attack JOHNSON.

William with about 300 men under Colonel DUBOIS crossed the Mohawk River and started in pursuit of JOHNSON. DUBOIS and his men caught up with the enemy at Klocks and Failing's Flats and another battle ensued. The battle lasted until darkness fell over the battlefield and the enemy retreated back to Canada. William was discharged on January 1, 1781.

In the spring of 1781, William again enlisted in Captain FONDA's Company.

On October 24th, Major John ROSS and Captain Walter BUTLER with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus WILLETT, who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, upon learning of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what troops that could be spared from that fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

In the morning of October 25th, Colonel WILLETT with his men marched down the south side of the Mohawk River and crossed the river over to Caughnawaga. Here WILLETT was joined by the troops from Fort Paris and WALLACE also joined Colonel WILLETT and his men.

Colonel WILLETT ordered William FEETER and WALLACE to go to Johnstown and search for the whereabouts of the enemy. The two scouts discovered the enemy encamped near Johnson's Hall and WALLACE went to inform WILLETT and FEETER then went to Fort Johnstown to inform Captain John LITTLE of the enemy's whereabouts.

About a half hour later WILLETT with his men arrived at Fort Johnstown. The garrison informed them that the enemy was still encamped near Johnson's Hall. WILLETT with his men left the fort and proceeded to Johnson's Hall.

On arriving at Johnson's Hall WILLETT and his men charged the enemy and a fierce battle now ensued. WILLETT ordered Major Aaron ROWLEY with about 150 men to circle around and attack the enemy from the rear. WALLACE under ROWLEY started on this maneuver and just as they reached the rear of the enemy, WILLETT and his men retreated from the field.

ROWLEY and his men kept up a hot fire on the enemy and minutes later WILLETT returned onto the field and the battle raged until darkness fell on the battlefield and with the enemy retreating. During the battle WALLACE and ROWLEY were wounded and after the battle was over their wounds were treated.

WALLACE served until the end of the war in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment.

William was born in 1746 and he died on February 26, 1837. William is buried in the Colonial Cemetery on Green Street in Johnstown.

SELAH WOODWORTH: CAPTURES A LOYALIST

In the spring of 1776, Selah enlisted while living at Mayfield as a private in Captain Emanuel DEGRAFF's Company (Seventh Company) in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

In the spring of 1777, Selah again enlisted in Captain Emanuel DEGRAFF's Company.

In the spring of 1778, Selah enlisted as a sergeant in Captain John LITTLE's Company in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment.

In 1779 and 1780, Selah served in Captain John LITTLE's Company for three months in each year.

In the spring of 1781, Selah again enlisted in Captain LITTLE's Company.

In the first part of October, John COOK, JR. With about twelve men from the King's Royal Regiment of New York fired upon the sentry at Fort Johnstown. The sentry returned the fire and hit COOK in the knee. A few days later Selah and Stephen SHEW and several others on learning that they were hiding in the woods near COOK's father's house went there to take them prisoner. COOK with a few others were taken prisoners and were taken back to Fort Johnstown and from there to Albany.

In the spring of 1782, Selah again enlisted in Captain LITTLE's Company.

Selah was born in Salisbury, Connecticut in 1750 and he died in Mayfield on October 25, 1823. Selah Married Rebecca DUNHAM on December 20, 1773 at Salisbury, Connecticut. Rebecca was born in 1758 and she died on June 5, 1839.

SOLOMON WOODWORTH: A STAUNCH WHIG

In the spring of 1776, Solomon while living at Mayfield enlisted with his brother Selah as a private in Captain Emanuel DEGRAFF's Company (Seventh Company) in Colonel Frederick VISSCHER's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment).

In the spring of 1777, Solomon again enlisted in Captain DEGRAFF's Company.

In April, Solomon with Frederick SAMMONS and John KOMLAN were ordered out on a scout and were out for six days.

In April of 1778, Solomon enlisted as sergeant in Captain Samuel REES' Company in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment. Sergeant WOODWORTH with Ebenezer DUNHAM went out on a scout and after a few days returned to Fort Johnstown.

On June 2nd, WOODWORTH, while on a scout to the Fish House, found some of the homes empty and he also discovered the tracks of a large raiding party. WOODWORTH now headed for the home of Godfrey SHEW to warn him of a possible raid on his house.

Early in the morning of June 3rd, Solomon with Godfrey and John SHEW left the house in order to find the enemy's whereabouts. Jacob and Stephen stayed behind to guard the house. After traveling some distance, the scouting party was surprised and taken prisoners by a party of Indians under Lieutenant John ROSS of the 34th Regiment. They were taken to enemy's nearby encampment.

Jacob and Stephen were taken prisoners by another party of Indians and they were brought to the encampment. The SHEW home and barn were set on fire leaving Mrs. SHEW with her children homeless.

The raiding party broke camp and put their prisoners in canoes and headed up the Sacondaga River to Canada. That night they put ashore near the present day Conklingville and encamped there for the night. WOODWORTH late that night made his escape by pretending to be sick and he was allowed to go down to the river by himself. He traveled all night and on June 4th, late in the day he arrived at Johnstown.

Later that summer Solomon enlisted as a sergeant in Captain LITTLE's Company.

On April 11th, a party of Indians raided the home of Jacob DUNHAM. Jacob and his son Samuel were killed while at work in one of their fields. Mrs. DUNHAM with her children escaped into the woods and after the Indians had left she headed for Johnstown. On arriving at Fort Johnstown she informed Captain LITTLE what had happened. Sergeant WOODWORTH quickly gathered a party of men and went to the DUNHAM home and buried the slain DUNHAM's and then went in pursuit of the enemy.

After traveling several miles they came upon the Indian encampment but only found one of the Indians there. The Indian refused to tell the whereabouts of his comrades and WOODWORTH and his men shot him and returned to Fort Johnstown.

In May, Solomon under Colonel VISSCHER, Colonel Peter GANESVOORT and Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus WILLETT with part of the militia and a detachment from the Third New York Continental Regiment were in Mayfield building a blockhouse. The Sacondaga Blockhouse was completed after two weeks of hard work.

In the summer, Lieutenant Benjamin DELINE, Sergeant Henry SHEW and WOODWORTH had learned that a Loyalist by the name of John HELMER had been hiding in Fonda's Bush on his way to his hiding place the three Patriots took him prisoner and put him in the Johnstown Jail at Fort Johnstown. Early in 1780, Solomon with this wife moved into the Sacondaga Blockhouse for protection against any possible Indian raids.

In March, Solomon enlisted in Captain LITTLE's Company. On March 27th, Mrs. WOODWORTH with Captain Emanuel DEGRAFF with his detachment left the blockhouse leaving WOODWORTH to guard the blockhouse alone.

About midnight on Tuesday on March 28th a party of seven Indians including their leader, John BRANT attempted to set the roof of the blockhouse on fire. On going outside WOODWORTH discovered a few of the boards on the roof on fire and on spotting the Indians returned into the blockhouse but not before the Indians had fired at him and he was slightly hit in the side. WOODWORTH quickly knocked off the burning boards and he went to one of the loopholes and fired at the Indians.

WOODWORTH's aim was more accurate and one of the Indians was hit in the thigh and he fell to the ground with a broken leg. The other Indians picked up their wounded comrade and retreated back into the woods. Thursday, March 30th, Solomon with five men went in pursuit of the enemy on snowshoes and they came upon the enemy's encampment on Saturday, April 1st.

Five of the Indians were found near the camp fire drying the meat of an elk that they had recently killed. The Indians fired at WOODWORTH and his men but missed them. WOODWORTH then grabbed one of the Indians and tomahawked him to death and then WOODWORTH grabbed another Indiana and killed him. The other militiamen killed the remaining Indians. Two other Indians were out hunting and on returning to their camp found their dead comrades and immediately headed back to Canada. WOODWORTH and his men took the dead Indians' packs and muskets and returned to Fort Johnstown.

On May 11th, Solomon was appointed Lieutenant in Captain Garret PUTMAN's Company in Colonel John HARPER's's Regiment of New York State Levies.

One June 27th, Lieutenant WOODWORTH with Isaac PICKERD and several others were out on alarm and while searching for traces of the enemy when they heard musket fire towards Fort Windecker and immediately headed for that fort. On arriving there they found that Jacob NELLIS had been killed by a party of Indians. WOODWORTH and his men went in pursuit of the enemy but it was in vain.

Solomon was stationed at Fort Herkimer and Fort Rensselaer. Solomon was discharged on January 1, 1781.

On March 8, 1781, Solomon was appointed First Lieutenant in Captain LITTLE's Company in Colonel VISSCHER's Regiment.

On April 27th, Solomon was appointed Lieutenant in Captain Thomas SKINNER's Company in Colonel Marinus WILLETT"s Regiment of New York State Levies for nine months.

In July, Solomon was appointed Captain of a company of levies in Colonel WILLETT's Regiment.

On September 6th, Captain WOODWORTH with his company and six Oneida Indians marched out of Fort Rensselaer on their way to Fort Dayton. They arrived there towards evening and spent the night there.

In the morning of September 7th, Captain WOODWORTH with his company marched out of Fort Dayton to scout along the West Canada Creek. About ten o'clock that morning about two miles from the fort they discovered the tracks of a raiding party. They followed the trail for about another mile when one of Woodworth's men in advance spotted an Indian and fired at him.

Suddenly the air was filled with the whizzing of musket balls and war shoops of the Indians. WOODWORTH and his men had fallen into an ambush set by Lieutenant Jacob CLEMENT of Butler's Rangers with about eighty Indians and Butler's Rangers. About ten of Woodworth's men fell dead from the first volley.

Moses YOCKUM, one of the Oneida Indians, was wounded in the hip and the other Indians picked him up and took him back to Fort Dayton. After about fifteen minutes of fighting WOODWORTH who was standing near Jacob SHEW was hit in the chest with a musket ball and he fell dead. Now the enemy charged the scouts and those that could fled and the rest were taken prisoners.

Captain WOODWORTH, Orderly Sergeant John DUNHAM, Privates Annais ARCHEY, Daniel DODGE, Giles PARKER*, and about fifteen others were killed. Lieutenant ............WILSON**, Corporal David PUTMAN, Privates Henry COVEL, John MOYER, Ebenezer PEASE, Joel SAVAGE, John L. SCHERMERHORN and Stephen VALENTINE were captured. Corporal Jacob SHEW, Privates Jacob BURKE, David CADY, JR., (who had received a wound in the left arm), David MOYER, Rynier VANSICKLER and ten other men escaped back to Fort Dayton.

On September 8th, Captain Garret PUTMAN with his company and with some of the survivors from Woodworth's Company returned to the site of the ambush and buried the fallen scouts in one grave.

Solomon was born to Caleb and Jane (MUNGER) on May 4, 1748. Solomon married Phebe THORNTON on October 18, 1770. On April 7, 1771, a son who was named Caleb after Solomon's father was born to Solomon and Phebe. Caleb died on April 14, 1771. It is believed that Solomon and Phebe had more children after 1771 but their names and date of birth are not known.

*Henry COVEL, Giles PARKER and Ebenezer PEASE were privates from Colonel Elisha PORTER's Regiment of Massachusetts's Levies. Major Aaron ROWLEY with part of this regiment were sent to New York and were stationed at Fort Rensselaer (Fort Plain) under the command of Colonel Marinus WILLETT. They went with WOODWORTH as volunteers from their regiment.

**There were two Lieutenants with the last name of WILSON in Colonel WILLETT's Regiment. It is not known if it was George or Richard as neither name appears in muster rolls of officers in 1782.

 

The above is transcribed from pages 49-53 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution, and typed by  volunteer,  Judy Anger, who comes from Herkimer/Montgomery County GenWeb .  A copy of this book can found at the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives in Fonda, New York.  Judy has found two Mohawk Valley ancestors who served in the Revolution: John HULSER b. abt. 1760 Germany, was 14-15 years old and joined Tryon County Militia Rangers.  Also, Frederick WELLER, b. 12-5-1757, Walkill, NY. Grandfather Johann Hieronimus Weller and familywere part of the Palatine Movement. Served as Sergeant in Capt. Abraham Oothout Regiment, 2nd Albany County Militia.  Other surnames from the area she is researching:  WELLER, WOODHULL, WILLSE, ORENDORF, HULSER, BASTIAN, VOORHEES, and BUNN.

 

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Last updated Tuesday, 13-May-2008 13:36:21 PDT