"A HISTORY OF FULTON COUNTY IN THE REVOLUTION"

By James F. Morrison


THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR STORY

CAPTAIN JOHN LITTLE: WOUNDED AT JOHNSTOWN

    In April of 1778, John while living at Johnstown, was appointed Captain in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). Captain Little and his company were stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    On June 2nd and 3rd, the inhabitants at Fish House and Mayfield were attacked by a party of Indians and Loyalists under Lieutenant John Ross. Captain Little at Fort Johnstown, on receiving word of this invasion, gathered a scouting party. Thomas Butler, Isaac DeGraff and John Higgins under Captain Little marched to Fish House and found several homes burned and the inhabitants missing and the scouting party returned to Fort Johnstown. Captain Little then went to Caughnawaga for additional troops but the enemy were now too far ahead to catch.

    In 1779 and 1780, Captain Little with his company were stationed at Fort Johnstown performing garrison and scouting duties.

    On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer on learning of the invasion sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what men that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

    In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left the fort in pursuit of the enemy. Captain Little at Fort Johnstown, on being informed of the invasion, organized a scouting party to go in search of signs of the enemy. Captain Little, Lieutenant Zepheniah Batcheller, Sergeant John Eikler, Sergeant Henry Shew, Corporal Jacob Shew, Privates John Brothers, William Feeter, Peter Yost Jr., David and John Moyer and three others left the fort in search of the enemy.

    Shortly after the scouting party left the fort, Major Ross and his men appeared before the fort. Stephen Shew, then on sentry duty, fired at them and the men in the fort turned out to defend the fort. After a few minutes of musket and cannon fire the enemy retreated from the fort. The garrison pursued the enemy through the Village of Johnstown when they were joined by Captain Little and his scouting party. Captain Little ordered the garrison back to the fort while he and his men would follow the enemy.

    Shortly after the garrison arrived at the fort, Colonel Willett and his men arrived. The garrison informed Colonel Willett what had happened and that the enemy were encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and headed for Johnson's Hall. Just as Colonel Willett and his troops arrived on the field, Captain Little and his men fell in with the rear guard of the enemy.

    Captain Little was hit in the right shoulder with a musket ball and the scouting party with their wounded captain took to the woods to find cover. Here another brief exchange of musket fire took place and Sergeant Eikler was killed. The scouting party now joined Willett on the battlefield.

    The battle raged until the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating. Captain Little with the rest of the wounded were taken to Fort Johnstown. Captain Little's would was properly dressed and by the spring of 1782 Little was back on duty at the fort. Captain Little served until the end of 1783 when he was discharged.

    John was commissioned Second Major in Lieutenant-Colonel Volkert Veeder's Regiment of Montgomery County Militia in Brigadier General Frederick Visscher's Brigade on October 2, 1786. He resigned his commission on March 23, 1790. John also served as sheriff and as Justice of the Peace and he also served in other positions as well.

    John was born in 1745 in Ireland and he died at Johnstown on September 29, 1822. His first wife was Leah Crawford but when she died is not known. John married for a second time Catherine McIntyre. She was born May 12, 1757 and she died on June 15, 1821. John and Catherine are buried in the Johnstown Colonial Cemetery on Green Street in Johnstown.

COMPANY OFFICERS

Captain John Little
First Lieutenant Solomon Woodworth
Second Lieutenant Henry M. Vrooman
Lieutenant Benjamin DeLine
Lieutenant Peter McNaughton
Ensign Peter Vrooman

SERGEANTS
Crosset, Benjamin Putman, Victor
Crosset, John Shew, Henry
Eikler, John Vrooman, Victor
Fishback, Henry Woodworth, Selah
Putman, John  

CORPORALS

Mason, John
Stephens, Amasa

PRIVATES
Anny, Godfrey Putman, Aaron
Brothers, John Putman, Cornelius
Davis, John Putman, David
Dockstader, Nicholas F. Redy, Charles
Dorn, John Jr. Rogers, Samuel
Dunham, Ebenezer Scarborough, William
Dunham, John Scott, Joseph
Dunn, James Jr. Shafer, John
Dunn, John Shan, Jacob
Kelly, Henry Shew, Jacob
Ketcham, Ephraim Shew, John
Lincomfelter, John Shew, Stephen
Lincomfelter, Michael VanSickler, Rynier
McArthur, Donald Walrath, Adolph
McArthur, Duncan White, David
McCollom, Findley Jr. Yost, Peter Jr.
McMartin, John Yoran, Jacob
McMartin, Peter Young, Lodowick
Philips, Philip  

 

ISAAC MASON: ENLISTS AT JOHNSTOWN

    In May of 1781, Isaac enlisted as a private in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies while living at Johnstown. Isaac, with his brother Jeremiah, were stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    In the first part of October a party of twelve men of the King's Royal Regiment of New York under John Cook attacked Fort Johnstown. A sentry on duty after being fired at returned the fire and Cook was hit in the knee. Isaac, with the rest of the garrison, quickly turned out to defend the fort but the enemy had already fled. Cook with a few others were later captured.

    On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Willett at Fort Rensselaer, on learning of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops while he would gather what troops that could be spared from the fort and go in pursuit of the enemy.

    In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left Fort Rensselaer in pursuit of the enemy. Colonel Willett and his men crossed the Mohawk River to Caughnawaga and from there they marched to Johnstown. The garrison informed Colonel Willett that the enemy were encamped near Johnson's Hall and Isaac and Jeremiah left Fort Johnstown under Colonel Willett and they marched to the enemy's encampment near Johnson's Hall.

    On arrival of Willett and his men at the enemy's encampment, a fierce battle soon raged. The battle ended with the coming of darkness and with the enemy retreating. Isaac now learned that his brother John was wounded and his brother-in-law William Scarborough was killed. Isaac and Jeremiah returned to Fort Johnstown where they were stationed. Isaac was discharged on January 1, 1782.

    In January of 1782, Isaac enlisted as a private in Captain John Wemple's Company (Fourth Company) in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment). Isaac again was stationed at Fort Johnstown. Once on a scout under Captain Wemple they found a family killed and scalped and they buried them. Isaac served under Captain Wemple until the end of the war.

    Isaac enlisted as a private at Sodus Point, New York on June 14, 1813 in Captain Hull's Company and he was discharged on July 8, 1813.

    Isaac was born on April 4, 1767 in Somerset, New Jersey and he died on January 30, 1856 in Davis County, Iowa. He is buried in the Macey's Mound Cemetery southwest of Drakesville, Iowa. Isaac married Anna Clarke on June 28, 1792 at Johnstown. Anna died in 1846 in Van Buren County, Iowa. Isaac married Margaret White on September 30, 1847.

    On May 31, 1976, two stone memorials were dedicated to Isaac Mason, Sr. and his son Isaac Jr. The stone memorials were placed in a park in Drakesville, Isaac is the only Revolutionary War Veteran buried in Davis County, Iowa.

    I am very thankful to Mr. Arnold Wilkerson of Ashland, Oregon who is a descendant of Isaac Mason for sending me the information on Isaac's burial and the dedication of the stone memorial plus other family information.

 JEREMIAH MASON: SERVES WITH BROTHERS

    In May of 1781, Jeremiah with his father, and his brothers Isaac and John while living at Johnstown enlisted as a private in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies. Jeremiah and Isaac were stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Willett at Fort Rensselaer, on receiving news of the invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops, while he would gather what troops that could be spared from that fort and go in pursuit of Major Ross and his men.

    In the morning of October 25th, Colonel Willett and his men left Fort Rensselaer in pursuit of the enemy. Willett and his men crossed the Mohawk River to Caughnawaga and from there they proceeded to Fort Johnstown in the Village of Johnstown. Colonel Willett was informed by the garrison at the fort that the enemy were encamped near Johnson's Hall. Jeremiah and Isaac under Colonel Willett left the fort and marched to the enemy's encampment.

    On reaching the enemy's encampment, Colonel Willett and his men charged the enemy. The battle raged until darkness fell and with the enemy retreating. Jeremiah with others gathered the dead and they buried them. Jeremiah returned to Fort Johnstown where he was stationed. He was discharged on January 1, 1782.

    In April of 1872, Jeremiah enlisted in Captain Peter B. Tearce's Company of Light Infantry in Colonel Willett's Regiment. Jeremiah was discharged on January 1, 1783.

    Jeremiah also served as a private in Captain Jellis Fonda's Company of Associate Exempts in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) in between his enlistments in Colonel Willett's Regiment.

    Jeremiah was born in 1765 in Somerset County, New Jersey and he was living at Johnstown in 1832 but the date of his death is not known. Jeremiah married Mary Smith on November 8, 1792 at Johnstown.

JOHN MASON: MARRIED AT NICHOLAS STONER'S HOME

    John enlisted as a private while living at Johnstown in April of 1777 in Captain David McMaster's Company (Sixth Company) in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tyron County Militia (Third Regiment).

    On August 3rd, Fort Schuyler was completely surrounded and besieged by the troops of Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger. Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer ordered the Tryon County Militia to muster at Fort Dayton. John under Captain McMaster and Colonel Visscher joined the gathering militia at Fort Dayton.

    On August 4th, the relief column marched out of Fort Dayton on their way to Fort Schuyler. On August 6th, about ten o'clock in the morning the relief column was ambushed near Oriskany Creek. The battle lasted until late in the afternoon when a sortie from the fort under Lieutenant-Colonel Marinus Willett attacked the enemy encampments near the fort.

    The enemy retreated on hearing musket and cannon fire in their rear at their encampments. The remnants of the relief column gathered their wounded and some of the dead and marched to the Oriskany Oneida Indian Village and spent the night there. In the morning of August 7th, the relief column started on their way back to Fort Dayton and Fort Herkimer. They reached those forts on August 9th.

    John served the remainder of the year in Captain McMaster's Company and in Captain William Snook's Company (Fifth Company) in Colonel Visscher's Regiment.

    In the spring of 1778, John enlisted in Captain John Little's Company in Colonel Visscher's Regiment. John was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    On November 11th, the Cherry Valley settlement was attacked and burned to the ground by Indians and Loyalists under Walter Butler and Joseph Brant. John was ordered out with about 200 men to go to the relief of Cherry Valley and he returned home about a week later.

    In the spring of 1779, John again enlisted in Captain Little's Company and he was stationed at Fort Johnstown.

    In the spring of 1780, John again enlisted in Captain Little's Company. He was stationed at Fort Johnstown, Fort Herkimer and Fort Schuyler.

    On October 19th, Colonel Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists were burning and killing near the Stone Arabia settlement. Johnson and his men fought a battle with American troops under Colonel John Brown at Stone Arabia where after about fifteen minutes of fighting the Americans retreated leaving Colonel Brown and about forty-five men from his command behind dead.

    John, under Lieutenant-Colonel Volkert Veeder had been ordered to join the gathering militia under General Robert Van Rensselaer near Fort Rensselaer. The army now crossed the Mohawk River and John under Colonel Lewis DuBois, Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Campbell and Lieutenant-Colonel Veeder with about 300 men closely pursued the enemy and finally made contact with them at Klock's and Failing's Flats.

    A fierce battle again raged but Johnson and his men escaped under the cover of darkness back to Canada. Colonel DuBois was unable to pursue Johnson because the promised reinforcements from Van Rensselaer never arrived.

    In April of 1781, John enlisted in Captain Garret Putman's Company in Colonel Marinus Willett's Regiment of New York State Levies.

    On October 24th, Major John Ross and Captain Walter Butler with 607 men were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Colonel Marinus Willett who was in command at Fort Rensselaer, on receiving news of this invasion, sent messengers to Forts Clyde, Paris and Plank for additional troops.

    Colonel Willett gathered what troops there were at Fort Rensselaer and went in pursuit of the enemy in the morning of October 25th. John, under Captain Putman, joined Colonel Willett in pursuit of the enemy. Colonel Willett crossed the Mohawk River to Caughnawaga and they proceeded to Fort Johnstown.

    Colonel Willett on arriving at the fort was informed by the garrison that the enemy was encamped near Johnson's Hall. Colonel Willett and his men left the fort and marched to the enemy's encampment. On the arrival of Willett and his men a fierce battle soon raged. The battle lasted until darkness fell on the battlefield and with the enemy retreating.

    In the heat of the battle John was hit in the left side with a musket ball. John was taken to Fort Johnstown with the rest of the wounded to have his wound properly dressed. At the fort he learned that his brother-in-law William Scarborough had been killed in the battle.

    John married Chloe Griswold on August 4, 1788 at the home of Nicholas Stoner by the Reverend Thomas Romeyn. John died in April 20, 1816.

ADAM PLANK: SERVES AS PRIVATE

    Adam served as a private in Captain Emanuel DeGraff's Company (Seventh Company) and in Captain Abraham Veeder's Company (Second Company) in Colonel Frederick Visscher's Regiment of Tryon County Militia (Third Regiment) while living in Johnstown. It is not known when or how long Adam served in these companies.

   Adam was born on February 29, 1736 and he died on June 7, 1815. He married Catherine Kline and she died on March 5, 1815. They are buried in the Old Lutheran Cemetery two miles west of Johnstown on the Johnstown-Ephratah Road.

 

The above is from pages 24-27 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution, and typed by dedicated volunteer,  Peggy Menear.  A copy of this book can found at the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives in Fonda, New York.  Peggy is researching her Chatterton line from the Mohawk Valley.  If you have any connection to or information about the Chatterton's, she would love to hear from you.

 

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Last updated Tuesday, 13-May-2008 13:36:16 PDT